The effect of potential fall distance on hormonal response in rock climbing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621056
Title:
The effect of potential fall distance on hormonal response in rock climbing
Authors:
Baláš, Jiří; Giles, David ( 0000-0002-5590-5734 ) ; Chrastinová, Leona; Kárníková, Kateřina; Kodejška, Jan; Hlaváčková, Alžběta; Vomáčko, Ladislav; Draper, Nick ( 0000-0002-4466-3792 )
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alterations in potential lead fall distance on the hormonal responses of rock climbers. Nine advanced female climbers completed two routes whilst clipping all (PRO-all) or half (PRO-½) of the fixed points of protection. Venous blood samples were analysed for total catecholamines, noradrenaline, adrenaline, dopamine, lactate, cortisol and serotonin. Differences between the two conditions pre, immediately post and 15 minutes post climbing were assessed using a 2x3 repeated measures ANOVA. All hormones and blood lactate concentrations increased significantly (p < 0.05) immediately post climb, except for cortisol. Peak cortisol concentrations did not occur until 15 min post ascent. Further, significant interactions between climbing and clipping conditions were found for total catecholamines (890% of basal concentration in PRO-½ vs. 568% in PRO-all), noradrenaline (794% vs. 532%) and dopamine (500% vs. 210%). There were no significant interactions for adrenaline (1920% vs 1045%), serotonin (150% vs 127%), or lactate (329% vs 279%). The study showed a greater catecholamine response with an increase in potential lead fall distance. The most pronounced increases seen in catecholamine concentration were reported for dopamine and noradrenaline.
Affiliation:
Charles University; University of Derby; Institute of Hematology and Blood Transfusion
Citation:
Baláš, J. et al (2016) 'The effect of potential fall distance on hormonal response in rock climbing', Journal of Sports Sciences, 35 (10). DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2016.1206667
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Journal of Sports Sciences
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621056
DOI:
10.1080/02640414.2016.1206667
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2016.1206667
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0264-0414
EISSN:
1466-447X
Appears in Collections:
Department of Life Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBaláš, Jiříen
dc.contributor.authorGiles, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorChrastinová, Leonaen
dc.contributor.authorKárníková, Kateřinaen
dc.contributor.authorKodejška, Janen
dc.contributor.authorHlaváčková, Alžbětaen
dc.contributor.authorVomáčko, Ladislaven
dc.contributor.authorDraper, Nicken
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-24T16:28:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-24T16:28:00Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationBaláš, J. et al (2016) 'The effect of potential fall distance on hormonal response in rock climbing', Journal of Sports Sciences, 35 (10). DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2016.1206667en
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640414.2016.1206667-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621056-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to examine the effect of alterations in potential lead fall distance on the hormonal responses of rock climbers. Nine advanced female climbers completed two routes whilst clipping all (PRO-all) or half (PRO-½) of the fixed points of protection. Venous blood samples were analysed for total catecholamines, noradrenaline, adrenaline, dopamine, lactate, cortisol and serotonin. Differences between the two conditions pre, immediately post and 15 minutes post climbing were assessed using a 2x3 repeated measures ANOVA. All hormones and blood lactate concentrations increased significantly (p < 0.05) immediately post climb, except for cortisol. Peak cortisol concentrations did not occur until 15 min post ascent. Further, significant interactions between climbing and clipping conditions were found for total catecholamines (890% of basal concentration in PRO-½ vs. 568% in PRO-all), noradrenaline (794% vs. 532%) and dopamine (500% vs. 210%). There were no significant interactions for adrenaline (1920% vs 1045%), serotonin (150% vs 127%), or lactate (329% vs 279%). The study showed a greater catecholamine response with an increase in potential lead fall distance. The most pronounced increases seen in catecholamine concentration were reported for dopamine and noradrenaline.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2016.1206667en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Sports Sciencesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectCatecholaminesen
dc.subjectCortisolen
dc.subjectSerotoninen
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.titleThe effect of potential fall distance on hormonal response in rock climbingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1466-447X-
dc.contributor.departmentCharles Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Hematology and Blood Transfusionen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciencesen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.