“People think it’s a harmless joke”: young people’s understanding of the impact of technology, digital vulnerability and cyberbullying in the United Kingdom

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621044
Title:
“People think it’s a harmless joke”: young people’s understanding of the impact of technology, digital vulnerability and cyberbullying in the United Kingdom
Authors:
Betts, Lucy R.; Spenser, Karin A. ( 0000-0001-7512-8031 )
Abstract:
Young people's technology use has increased exponentially over the last few years. To gain a deeper understanding of young peoples' experiences of digital technology and cyberbullying, four focus groups were conducted with 29 11- to 15-year-olds recruited from two schools. Interpretative phenomenological analysis revealed three themes: impact of technology, vulnerability and cyberbullying. Technology was seen as a facilitator and a mechanism for maintaining social interactions. However, participants reported experiencing a conflict between the need to be sociable and the desire to maintain privacy. Cyberbullying was regarded as the actions of an anonymous coward who sought to disrupt social networks and acts should be distinguished from banter.
Affiliation:
Nottingham Trent University
Citation:
Betts, L. R and Spenser, K. A. (2017) '"People think it's a harmless joke": young people's understanding of the impact of technology, digital vulnerability and cyberbullying in the United Kingdom,' Journal of Children and Media, 11 (1), pp. 20-35. DOI: 10.1080/17482798.2016.1233893
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Journal of Children and Media
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621044
DOI:
10.1080/17482798.2016.1233893
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17482798.2016.1233893
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1748-2798
EISSN:
1748-2801
Sponsors:
British Academy [grant number SG121267].
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBetts, Lucy R.en
dc.contributor.authorSpenser, Karin A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-23T14:56:43Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-23T14:56:43Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationBetts, L. R and Spenser, K. A. (2017) '"People think it's a harmless joke": young people's understanding of the impact of technology, digital vulnerability and cyberbullying in the United Kingdom,' Journal of Children and Media, 11 (1), pp. 20-35. DOI: 10.1080/17482798.2016.1233893en
dc.identifier.issn1748-2798-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17482798.2016.1233893-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621044-
dc.description.abstractYoung people's technology use has increased exponentially over the last few years. To gain a deeper understanding of young peoples' experiences of digital technology and cyberbullying, four focus groups were conducted with 29 11- to 15-year-olds recruited from two schools. Interpretative phenomenological analysis revealed three themes: impact of technology, vulnerability and cyberbullying. Technology was seen as a facilitator and a mechanism for maintaining social interactions. However, participants reported experiencing a conflict between the need to be sociable and the desire to maintain privacy. Cyberbullying was regarded as the actions of an anonymous coward who sought to disrupt social networks and acts should be distinguished from banter.en
dc.description.sponsorshipBritish Academy [grant number SG121267].en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621044en
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17482798.2016.1233893en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Children and Mediaen
dc.subjectCyberbullyingen
dc.subjectOnline vulnerabilityen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.title“People think it’s a harmless joke”: young people’s understanding of the impact of technology, digital vulnerability and cyberbullying in the United Kingdomen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1748-2801-
dc.contributor.departmentNottingham Trent Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Children and Mediaen
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