Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/620698
Title:
Cryopreservation of quince (Cydonia oblonga mill.)
Authors:
Lynch, Paul; Siddika, Ayesha; Mehra, Aradhana; Benelli, Carla; Lambardi, Maurizo
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.) has great potential for utilisation in pharmaceutical and food industries. OBJECTIVE: The study was to develop an efficient cryopreservation approachfor quince. METHODS: Factors on the survival and regrowth such as cold acclimation, explant type and recovery media composition were assessed. The effectiveness of the resultant protocols for a number of quince cultivars was determined. RESULTS and CONCLUSION: Quince shoot tips and nodal sections are successfully cryopreserved. Sustained regrowth of quince ‘Angers A’ was observed after encapsulation-osmoprotection/dehydration, encapsulation-dehydration and PVS2 vitrification. The highest regrowth rate (80%) was obtained from explants excised from cold hardened shoots and cryopreserved using encapsulation-osmoprotection/dehydration and vitrification protocols. The optimised vitrification protocol in combination with shoot cold hardening and a MS recovery mediumwithout activated charcoal and auxin resulted in satisfactory regrowth of shoots from six quince cultivars. The morphology of acclimatised plants derived from cryopreserved shoots was comparablewith non-cryopreserved plants.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Lynch, P, Siddika, A, Mehra, A, Benelli, C, & Lambardi, M., (2014) 'CRYOPRESERVATION OF QUINCE (CYDONIA OBLONGA MILL.)', Cryoletters, 35, 3, pp. 188-196
Publisher:
CryoLetters
Journal:
CryoLetters
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/620698
Additional Links:
http://www.cryoletters.org/Abstracts/vol_35_3_2014.htm#188
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0143-2044
Sponsors:
Ayesha Siddika is grateful to the University of Derby for the research studentship. The authors acknowledge the Commission of European Union for funding 196 support through CRYMCEPT (Establishing Cryopreservation Methods for Conserving European Plant Germplasm Collections, Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources, QLK5-CT-2002-01279) and CRYOPLANET, COST Action 871 (Establishing Cryopreservation of Crop Species in Europe ). Maurizio Lambardi thanks the Ente Cassa di Risparmio of Florence for the support for this study (project POLICENTRO).
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Sustainability Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLynch, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorSiddika, Ayeshaen
dc.contributor.authorMehra, Aradhanaen
dc.contributor.authorBenelli, Carlaen
dc.contributor.authorLambardi, Maurizoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-07T11:45:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-07T11:45:20Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationLynch, P, Siddika, A, Mehra, A, Benelli, C, & Lambardi, M., (2014) 'CRYOPRESERVATION OF QUINCE (CYDONIA OBLONGA MILL.)', Cryoletters, 35, 3, pp. 188-196en
dc.identifier.issn0143-2044-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620698-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.) has great potential for utilisation in pharmaceutical and food industries. OBJECTIVE: The study was to develop an efficient cryopreservation approachfor quince. METHODS: Factors on the survival and regrowth such as cold acclimation, explant type and recovery media composition were assessed. The effectiveness of the resultant protocols for a number of quince cultivars was determined. RESULTS and CONCLUSION: Quince shoot tips and nodal sections are successfully cryopreserved. Sustained regrowth of quince ‘Angers A’ was observed after encapsulation-osmoprotection/dehydration, encapsulation-dehydration and PVS2 vitrification. The highest regrowth rate (80%) was obtained from explants excised from cold hardened shoots and cryopreserved using encapsulation-osmoprotection/dehydration and vitrification protocols. The optimised vitrification protocol in combination with shoot cold hardening and a MS recovery mediumwithout activated charcoal and auxin resulted in satisfactory regrowth of shoots from six quince cultivars. The morphology of acclimatised plants derived from cryopreserved shoots was comparablewith non-cryopreserved plants.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAyesha Siddika is grateful to the University of Derby for the research studentship. The authors acknowledge the Commission of European Union for funding 196 support through CRYMCEPT (Establishing Cryopreservation Methods for Conserving European Plant Germplasm Collections, Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources, QLK5-CT-2002-01279) and CRYOPLANET, COST Action 871 (Establishing Cryopreservation of Crop Species in Europe ). Maurizio Lambardi thanks the Ente Cassa di Risparmio of Florence for the support for this study (project POLICENTRO).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCryoLettersen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.cryoletters.org/Abstracts/vol_35_3_2014.htm#188en
dc.subjectQuinceen
dc.subjectShoot tipsen
dc.subjectNodal sectionsen
dc.subjectCold hardeningen
dc.subjectRecovery mediumen
dc.titleCryopreservation of quince (Cydonia oblonga mill.)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalCryoLettersen
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