Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/620529
Title:
Dramatherapy Tai Chi & Embodiment
Authors:
Holmwood, Clive ( 0000-0002-7232-6013 )
Abstract:
This paper will consider potential theoretical, philosophical and pragmatic connections between Dramatherapy (Jones: 1996) and Tai Chi (Pang Jeng & Inn: 1985); I will specifically consider these connections from the Western perspective of embodiment (Shaw: 2003, Jones: 1996). Dramatherapy is a creative drama based psychological therapy. Tai Chi is an ancient form of martial art. Both approaches use movement and from a Western perspective that ‘embodiment’ could be central to both disciplines. I am interested in how embodiment through movement is a potential connection between these two seemingly very different disciplines, and how these may offer shared knowledge. I will acknowledge that the two disciplines come from very different backgrounds and philosophies and recognise that it is impossible not to generalise in a short article such as this. The aim is to compare and contrast these two disciplines based on my empirical experience of them. As a European trained Dramatherapist I approach this paper from a Western perspective, acknowledging the differing opinions and viewpoints between Eastern and Western philosophies and practice. The aim is to begin to consider some synthesis between a Western creative based therapy and an Eastern form of martial art; acknowledging that both use movement at their core.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Holmwood C (2015) Dramatherapy, Tai Chi and Embodiment in Creative Arts in Education and Therapy – Eastern and Western Perspectives Volume 1 No 1
Publisher:
Quotus Publishing
Journal:
Creative Arts in Education and Therapy Eastern & Western Perspectives
Issue Date:
Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/620529
DOI:
10.15534/CAET/2015/1/8
Additional Links:
http://caet.quotus.org/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2451-876X
Appears in Collections:
Department of Therapeutic Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHolmwood, Cliveen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-03T13:54:45Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-03T13:54:45Z-
dc.date.issued2015-12-
dc.identifier.citationHolmwood C (2015) Dramatherapy, Tai Chi and Embodiment in Creative Arts in Education and Therapy – Eastern and Western Perspectives Volume 1 No 1en
dc.identifier.issn2451-876X-
dc.identifier.doi10.15534/CAET/2015/1/8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620529-
dc.description.abstractThis paper will consider potential theoretical, philosophical and pragmatic connections between Dramatherapy (Jones: 1996) and Tai Chi (Pang Jeng & Inn: 1985); I will specifically consider these connections from the Western perspective of embodiment (Shaw: 2003, Jones: 1996). Dramatherapy is a creative drama based psychological therapy. Tai Chi is an ancient form of martial art. Both approaches use movement and from a Western perspective that ‘embodiment’ could be central to both disciplines. I am interested in how embodiment through movement is a potential connection between these two seemingly very different disciplines, and how these may offer shared knowledge. I will acknowledge that the two disciplines come from very different backgrounds and philosophies and recognise that it is impossible not to generalise in a short article such as this. The aim is to compare and contrast these two disciplines based on my empirical experience of them. As a European trained Dramatherapist I approach this paper from a Western perspective, acknowledging the differing opinions and viewpoints between Eastern and Western philosophies and practice. The aim is to begin to consider some synthesis between a Western creative based therapy and an Eastern form of martial art; acknowledging that both use movement at their core.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherQuotus Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://caet.quotus.org/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectDramatherapyen
dc.subjectTai Chien
dc.subjectEmbodimenten
dc.subjectChinese Philosophyen
dc.subjectYinen
dc.subjectEasternen
dc.subjectWesternen
dc.subjectYangen
dc.titleDramatherapy Tai Chi & Embodimenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalCreative Arts in Education and Therapy Eastern & Western Perspectivesen
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