Designing a new documentary landscape: A renegotiation of documentary voice through animated collage

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/620175
Title:
Designing a new documentary landscape: A renegotiation of documentary voice through animated collage
Authors:
Bosward, Marc; Bevan, Greg
Abstract:
Documentaries represent issues and aspects of the socio-historical world. They do so through a selection and combination of audio and visual components. Inevitably, this practice makes intrinsic claims about documentary’s ability to represent the world both accurately and reliably. Facts, information, balance and reliability are the bedrock of documentary vocabulary. Comparatively few practitioners have genuinely interrogated the veracity of their craft; authenticity, evidence and objectivity remain central to the language of their practice. As the result of a mediated process, a documentary film is, at best, a crafted version of reality and its conventions are designed and developed to convince audiences of the authenticity of their particular representation of the world. Documentary’s traditional journalistic and pseudo-scientific status has hampered its development as a discursive art form capable of exploring a much broader sphere of human experience. Using a selection of still images, this article aims to contextualize, reflect on and illuminate the short, animated documentary Fforest (2009) by G. Bevan and M. Bosward. Drawing on the practice and principles of collage, the film seeks to expand the language of documentary production by deliberately undermining traditional approaches to knowledge, authority and fact. It explores potential new terrain for documentary by generating a non-realist, visual aesthetic that is not bound to traditional discourses of ‘sobriety’, whilst reaffirming the documentary as a composition which must be designed and assembled, in which authorial voice must be constructed rather than simply stated, and in which meaning is not necessarily explicit.
Affiliation:
University of Derby; University of Aberystwyth
Citation:
Bevan, G. and Bosward, M. (2013), ‘Designing a new documentary landscape: A renegotiation of documentary voice through animated collage’, Scene 1: 3, pp. 443–456
Publisher:
Intellect
Journal:
Scene
Issue Date:
Dec-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/620175
DOI:
10.1386/scene.1.3.443_1
Additional Links:
http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=206/view,page=0/; http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Article,id=16810/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
20443714
Appears in Collections:
School of Arts

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBosward, Marcen
dc.contributor.authorBevan, Gregen
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:04:36Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:04:36Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-
dc.identifier.citationBevan, G. and Bosward, M. (2013), ‘Designing a new documentary landscape: A renegotiation of documentary voice through animated collage’, Scene 1: 3, pp. 443–456en
dc.identifier.issn20443714-
dc.identifier.doi10.1386/scene.1.3.443_1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620175-
dc.description.abstractDocumentaries represent issues and aspects of the socio-historical world. They do so through a selection and combination of audio and visual components. Inevitably, this practice makes intrinsic claims about documentary’s ability to represent the world both accurately and reliably. Facts, information, balance and reliability are the bedrock of documentary vocabulary. Comparatively few practitioners have genuinely interrogated the veracity of their craft; authenticity, evidence and objectivity remain central to the language of their practice. As the result of a mediated process, a documentary film is, at best, a crafted version of reality and its conventions are designed and developed to convince audiences of the authenticity of their particular representation of the world. Documentary’s traditional journalistic and pseudo-scientific status has hampered its development as a discursive art form capable of exploring a much broader sphere of human experience. Using a selection of still images, this article aims to contextualize, reflect on and illuminate the short, animated documentary Fforest (2009) by G. Bevan and M. Bosward. Drawing on the practice and principles of collage, the film seeks to expand the language of documentary production by deliberately undermining traditional approaches to knowledge, authority and fact. It explores potential new terrain for documentary by generating a non-realist, visual aesthetic that is not bound to traditional discourses of ‘sobriety’, whilst reaffirming the documentary as a composition which must be designed and assembled, in which authorial voice must be constructed rather than simply stated, and in which meaning is not necessarily explicit.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIntellecten
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=206/view,page=0/en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Article,id=16810/en
dc.subjectAnimationen
dc.subjectDocumentaryen
dc.subjectAuthorial voiceen
dc.subjectMediated landscapeen
dc.titleDesigning a new documentary landscape: A renegotiation of documentary voice through animated collageen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Aberystwythen
dc.identifier.journalSceneen
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.