Validation of the English version of the scale for psychosocial factors in food allergy and the relationship with mental health, quality of life, and self-efficacy

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/620036
Title:
Validation of the English version of the scale for psychosocial factors in food allergy and the relationship with mental health, quality of life, and self-efficacy
Authors:
Knibb, Rebecca C. ( 0000-0001-5561-0904 ) ; Cortes, Aaron; Barnes, Christopher ( 0000-0001-8318-4412 ) ; Stalker, Carol ( 0000-0002-9734-9924 )
Abstract:
Background. The Scale for Psychosocial Factors in Food Allergy (SPS-FA) is based on the biopsychosocial model of health and was developed and validated in Chile to measure the interaction between psychological variables and allergy symptoms in the child. We sought to validate this scale in an English speaking population and explore its relationship with parental quality of life, self-efficacy, and mental health. Methods. Parents (𝑛 = 434) from the general population in the UK, who had a child with a clinical diagnosis of food allergy, completed the SPS-FA and validated scales on food allergy specific parental quality of life (QoL), parental self-efficacy, and general mental health. Findings. The SPS-FA had good internal consistency (alphas = .61–.86). Higher scores on the SPS-FA significantly correlated with poorer parental QoL, self-efficacy, and mental health. All predictors explained 57% of the variance in SPS-FA scores with QoL as the biggest predictor (𝛽 = .52). Discussion. The SPS-FA is a valid scale for use in the UK and provides a holistic view of the impact of food allergy on the family. In conjunction with health-related QoL measures, it can be used by health care practitioners to target care for patients and evaluate psychological interventions for improvement of food allergy management.
Affiliation:
Aston University; University of Derby; Universidad de Chile Clinical Hospital
Citation:
Rebecca C. Knibb, Aaron Cortes, Christopher Barnes, and Carol Stalker, "Validation of the English Version of the Scale for Psychosocial Factors in Food Allergy and the Relationship with Mental Health, Quality of Life, and Self-Efficacy," Journal of Allergy, vol. 2016, Article ID 4850940, 7 pages, 2016. doi:10.1155/2016/4850940
Journal:
Journal of Allergy
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/620036
DOI:
10.1155/2016/4850940
Additional Links:
https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ja/2016/4850940/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Sponsors:
This study was funded by pump priming money from the Health and Lifespan Research Group at Aston University.
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKnibb, Rebecca C.en
dc.contributor.authorCortes, Aaronen
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorStalker, Carolen
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-12T13:19:09Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-12T13:19:09Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationRebecca C. Knibb, Aaron Cortes, Christopher Barnes, and Carol Stalker, "Validation of the English Version of the Scale for Psychosocial Factors in Food Allergy and the Relationship with Mental Health, Quality of Life, and Self-Efficacy," Journal of Allergy, vol. 2016, Article ID 4850940, 7 pages, 2016. doi:10.1155/2016/4850940en
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2016/4850940-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620036-
dc.description.abstractBackground. The Scale for Psychosocial Factors in Food Allergy (SPS-FA) is based on the biopsychosocial model of health and was developed and validated in Chile to measure the interaction between psychological variables and allergy symptoms in the child. We sought to validate this scale in an English speaking population and explore its relationship with parental quality of life, self-efficacy, and mental health. Methods. Parents (𝑛 = 434) from the general population in the UK, who had a child with a clinical diagnosis of food allergy, completed the SPS-FA and validated scales on food allergy specific parental quality of life (QoL), parental self-efficacy, and general mental health. Findings. The SPS-FA had good internal consistency (alphas = .61–.86). Higher scores on the SPS-FA significantly correlated with poorer parental QoL, self-efficacy, and mental health. All predictors explained 57% of the variance in SPS-FA scores with QoL as the biggest predictor (𝛽 = .52). Discussion. The SPS-FA is a valid scale for use in the UK and provides a holistic view of the impact of food allergy on the family. In conjunction with health-related QoL measures, it can be used by health care practitioners to target care for patients and evaluate psychological interventions for improvement of food allergy management.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by pump priming money from the Health and Lifespan Research Group at Aston University.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/ja/2016/4850940/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectAllergyen
dc.subjectvalidationen
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen
dc.subjectPsychosocialen
dc.titleValidation of the English version of the scale for psychosocial factors in food allergy and the relationship with mental health, quality of life, and self-efficacyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAston Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidad de Chile Clinical Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Allergyen
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