Focus Stacking: Extending depth of field in close-up photography

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/619214
Title:
Focus Stacking: Extending depth of field in close-up photography
Authors:
Bryson, David ( 0000-0002-3086-7946 )
Abstract:
When taking close-up photographs, or indeed any photographs, there is a delicate balance of factors that allow us to limit or to maximise the parts of an image that are in focus; Aperture, Lens focal length and Subject distance. The choice then depends on what you are trying to show do you go for a larger working distance with a telephoto lens versus smaller working distance with a wide angle lens to gain the detail and depth of field you need. Then how far do you stop down your aperture? If you use smaller apertures that may not be getting the best out of your lens. This is where digital techniques to extend depth of field come into use with focus stacking.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Bryson, D. (2016) Focus Stacking: Extending depth of field in close-up photography. Heritage Photography, Spring 4-5.
Publisher:
Royal Photographic Society
Journal:
Heritage Photography
Issue Date:
Jan-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/619214
Additional Links:
http://www.rps.org/special-interest-groups/archaeology-and-heritage/about/ah-newsletter; http://www.rps.org/rps-journals
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0958-0565
Appears in Collections:
D-MARC

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBryson, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T10:26:59Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T10:26:59Z-
dc.date.issued2016-01-
dc.identifier.citationBryson, D. (2016) Focus Stacking: Extending depth of field in close-up photography. Heritage Photography, Spring 4-5.en
dc.identifier.issn0958-0565-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/619214-
dc.description.abstractWhen taking close-up photographs, or indeed any photographs, there is a delicate balance of factors that allow us to limit or to maximise the parts of an image that are in focus; Aperture, Lens focal length and Subject distance. The choice then depends on what you are trying to show do you go for a larger working distance with a telephoto lens versus smaller working distance with a wide angle lens to gain the detail and depth of field you need. Then how far do you stop down your aperture? If you use smaller apertures that may not be getting the best out of your lens. This is where digital techniques to extend depth of field come into use with focus stacking.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoyal Photographic Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rps.org/special-interest-groups/archaeology-and-heritage/about/ah-newsletteren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rps.org/rps-journalsen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.subjectDepth of fielden
dc.subjectFocusen
dc.subjectStackingen
dc.subjectClose-upen
dc.subjectPhotographyen
dc.titleFocus Stacking: Extending depth of field in close-up photographyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalHeritage Photographyen
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