New disease outbreak affects two dominant sea urchin species associated with Australian temperate reefs

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/618800
Title:
New disease outbreak affects two dominant sea urchin species associated with Australian temperate reefs
Authors:
Sweet, Michael J. ( 0000-0003-4983-8333 ) ; Bulling, Mark T.; Williamson, Jane E.
Abstract:
Diseases of sea urchins have been implicated in dramatic transitions of marine ecosystems. Although no definitive causal agent has been found for many of these outbreaks, mostare hypothesised to be waterborne and bacterial. Here we show the first report of a novel diseaseaffecting at least 2 species of urchins off the south-eastern coast of Australia. The aetiologicalagent, identified via a range of molecular techniques, immuno-histology and inoculation experi-ments, was found to be the opportunistic pathogen Vibrio anguillarum . The disease appears to betemperature-dependent, with a faster transmission rate and increase in prevalence during ex -perimental trials conducted at higher temperatures. Furthermore, analysis of long-term field datasuggests that it may have already reached epidemic proportions. With the increases in ocean temperatures brought about by climate change, this novel urchin disease may pose a severe problem for the organisms associated with the temperate reefs off Australia and/or the ecosystemas a whole.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Sweet, M. et al (2016) 'New disease outbreak affects two dominant sea urchin species associated with Australian temperate reefs', Marine Ecology Progress Series, 551:171
Journal:
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Issue Date:
9-Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/618800
DOI:
10.3354/meps11750
Additional Links:
http://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v551/p171-183/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
01718630; 16161599
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Sustainability Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSweet, Michael J.en
dc.contributor.authorBulling, Mark T.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Jane E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-25T10:56:56Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-25T10:56:56Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-09-
dc.identifier.citationSweet, M. et al (2016) 'New disease outbreak affects two dominant sea urchin species associated with Australian temperate reefs', Marine Ecology Progress Series, 551:171en
dc.identifier.issn01718630-
dc.identifier.issn16161599-
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps11750-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/618800-
dc.description.abstractDiseases of sea urchins have been implicated in dramatic transitions of marine ecosystems. Although no definitive causal agent has been found for many of these outbreaks, mostare hypothesised to be waterborne and bacterial. Here we show the first report of a novel diseaseaffecting at least 2 species of urchins off the south-eastern coast of Australia. The aetiologicalagent, identified via a range of molecular techniques, immuno-histology and inoculation experi-ments, was found to be the opportunistic pathogen Vibrio anguillarum . The disease appears to betemperature-dependent, with a faster transmission rate and increase in prevalence during ex -perimental trials conducted at higher temperatures. Furthermore, analysis of long-term field datasuggests that it may have already reached epidemic proportions. With the increases in ocean temperatures brought about by climate change, this novel urchin disease may pose a severe problem for the organisms associated with the temperate reefs off Australia and/or the ecosystemas a whole.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v551/p171-183/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Marine Ecology Progress Seriesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectUrchinen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.titleNew disease outbreak affects two dominant sea urchin species associated with Australian temperate reefsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalMarine Ecology Progress Seriesen
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