Interprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudes

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/608687
Title:
Interprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudes
Authors:
Roberts, Lynne D.; Forman, Dawn ( 0000-0002-3919-8291 )
Abstract:
Undergraduate psychology students have been largely excluded from interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives. In contrast to many health professions, undergraduate psychology students do not engage in work placements as part of their degree, and many enter careers outside the health care context. However, the collaborative skills gained through an IPE experience may well be beneficial to students who work in this wider context. This research examines whether undergraduate psychology students’ views of IPE vary according to their planned career directions, and if so, whether the perceived relevance of IPE mediates the relationships. A sample of 188 Australian university undergraduate psychology students completed an online questionnaire following completion of a first-year IPE health sciences program. Path analysis indicated that psychology students’ attitudes towards IPE are associated with both professional identification and practitioner orientation, fully mediated through the perceived relevance of IPE to future career and study plans. Stronger professional identification and practitioner orientation were associated with greater perceived relevance and more positive and less negative attitudes towards IPE. Placing a stronger emphasis on the generalizability of IP skills taught may increase students’ awareness of the relevance outside of the health context, reducing disengagement of students planning alternative careers.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Roberts, L. D. and Forman, D. (2014) 'Interprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudes', Journal of Interprofessional Care, 29 (3):188
Publisher:
Taylor Francis
Journal:
Journal of Interprofessional Care
Issue Date:
8-Oct-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/608687
DOI:
10.3109/13561820.2014.967754
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/13561820.2014.967754
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1356-1820; 1469-9567
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care Research Centre; University of Derby Online (UDOL); Institute of Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Lynne D.en
dc.contributor.authorForman, Dawnen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-09T13:36:00Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-09T13:36:00Zen
dc.date.issued2014-10-08en
dc.identifier.citationRoberts, L. D. and Forman, D. (2014) 'Interprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudes', Journal of Interprofessional Care, 29 (3):188en
dc.identifier.issn1356-1820en
dc.identifier.issn1469-9567en
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/13561820.2014.967754en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/608687en
dc.description.abstractUndergraduate psychology students have been largely excluded from interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives. In contrast to many health professions, undergraduate psychology students do not engage in work placements as part of their degree, and many enter careers outside the health care context. However, the collaborative skills gained through an IPE experience may well be beneficial to students who work in this wider context. This research examines whether undergraduate psychology students’ views of IPE vary according to their planned career directions, and if so, whether the perceived relevance of IPE mediates the relationships. A sample of 188 Australian university undergraduate psychology students completed an online questionnaire following completion of a first-year IPE health sciences program. Path analysis indicated that psychology students’ attitudes towards IPE are associated with both professional identification and practitioner orientation, fully mediated through the perceived relevance of IPE to future career and study plans. Stronger professional identification and practitioner orientation were associated with greater perceived relevance and more positive and less negative attitudes towards IPE. Placing a stronger emphasis on the generalizability of IP skills taught may increase students’ awareness of the relevance outside of the health context, reducing disengagement of students planning alternative careers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/13561820.2014.967754en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Interprofessional Careen
dc.subjectInterprofessional education, professional identity, psychology, surveysen
dc.titleInterprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Interprofessional Careen
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