Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/608618
Title:
The dismantling of probation: Who will profit?
Authors:
Teague, Michael
Abstract:
After 105 years of world-class rehabilitative intervention, the probation service in England and Wales is about to be effectively dismantled. The Ministry of Justice's 2013 consultation document, 'Transforming Rehabilitation', outlined plans to allow private companies and charities to manage a range of services, including community supervision. Probation is set to be stripped of its core responsibilities, with the exception of public protection work with high risk offenders and the provision of information to the courts. There is little doubt that what will remain will be a qualitatively different service. Regardless of the rhetoric accompanying the ‘rehabilitation revolution’, the reality may be that the privatisation of probation is about the deprioritisation of rehabilitation and penal-welfare intervention.
Affiliation:
Teesside University
Citation:
Teague, M. (2013) 'The dismantling of probation: Who will profit?', New Left Project, 19 Feb 2013, http://www.newleftproject.org/
Publisher:
New Left Project
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/608618
Additional Links:
http://www.newleftproject.org/index.php/site/article_comments/the_dismantling_of_probation_who_will_profit; http://www.newleftproject.org/
Type:
Other
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTeague, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-08T15:43:07Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-08T15:43:07Zen
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationTeague, M. (2013) 'The dismantling of probation: Who will profit?', New Left Project, 19 Feb 2013, http://www.newleftproject.org/en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/608618-
dc.description.abstractAfter 105 years of world-class rehabilitative intervention, the probation service in England and Wales is about to be effectively dismantled. The Ministry of Justice's 2013 consultation document, 'Transforming Rehabilitation', outlined plans to allow private companies and charities to manage a range of services, including community supervision. Probation is set to be stripped of its core responsibilities, with the exception of public protection work with high risk offenders and the provision of information to the courts. There is little doubt that what will remain will be a qualitatively different service. Regardless of the rhetoric accompanying the ‘rehabilitation revolution’, the reality may be that the privatisation of probation is about the deprioritisation of rehabilitation and penal-welfare intervention.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Left Projecten
dc.relation.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/608618en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.newleftproject.org/index.php/site/article_comments/the_dismantling_of_probation_who_will_profiten
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.newleftproject.org/en
dc.subjectprobationen
dc.subjectrehabilitation revolutionen
dc.subjecttransforming rehabilitationen
dc.subjectprivatizationen
dc.titleThe dismantling of probation: Who will profit?en
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside Universityen
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