Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/608610
Title:
Profiting from the Poor: Offender-funded probation in the USA
Authors:
Teague, Michael
Abstract:
The privatization of probation provision in England and Wales is now neither tentative nor experimental. Offender-funded probation in America is an inevitable by-product of the introduction of market forces into probation, and a significant growth area. A comparative analysis of the delivery of privatized, offender-funded probation in the USA is employed in order to illuminate one possible future trajectory for probation in England and Wales. The experience of service users in southern US states is considered, as is the evidence indicating an insufficiently regulated and privatized system which is primarily driven by revenue generation rather than rehabilitation. While many US privatized probation companies operate in a principled way, a number of cases involving these companies have culminated in the incarceration of service users who were unable to afford supervision fees. When a privatized company’s survival depends on its ability to raise revenue, this may impact on the quality of intervention and the experience of service users. We are not yet at a point where offender-funded intervention is advocated in England. Nevertheless, there is a need to further reflect upon ethical, fiscal, political and practice issues before we irrevocably commit probation further down its current path.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Teague, M. (2016). 'Profiting from the Poor: Offender-funded probation in the USA.' British Journal of Community Justice 14(1): 99-111.
Publisher:
De Montfort University and Sheffield Hallam University
Journal:
British Journal of Community Justice
Issue Date:
Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/608610
Additional Links:
http://www.cjp.org.uk/bjcj/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTeague, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-08T15:26:59Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-08T15:26:59Zen
dc.date.issued2016-04en
dc.identifier.citationTeague, M. (2016). 'Profiting from the Poor: Offender-funded probation in the USA.' British Journal of Community Justice 14(1): 99-111.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/608610-
dc.description.abstractThe privatization of probation provision in England and Wales is now neither tentative nor experimental. Offender-funded probation in America is an inevitable by-product of the introduction of market forces into probation, and a significant growth area. A comparative analysis of the delivery of privatized, offender-funded probation in the USA is employed in order to illuminate one possible future trajectory for probation in England and Wales. The experience of service users in southern US states is considered, as is the evidence indicating an insufficiently regulated and privatized system which is primarily driven by revenue generation rather than rehabilitation. While many US privatized probation companies operate in a principled way, a number of cases involving these companies have culminated in the incarceration of service users who were unable to afford supervision fees. When a privatized company’s survival depends on its ability to raise revenue, this may impact on the quality of intervention and the experience of service users. We are not yet at a point where offender-funded intervention is advocated in England. Nevertheless, there is a need to further reflect upon ethical, fiscal, political and practice issues before we irrevocably commit probation further down its current path.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDe Montfort University and Sheffield Hallam Universityen
dc.relation.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/608610en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.cjp.org.uk/bjcj/en
dc.subjectprobationen
dc.subjectAmericaen
dc.subjectoffender-fundeden
dc.subjectprivatizationen
dc.titleProfiting from the Poor: Offender-funded probation in the USAen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Community Justiceen
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