Rehabilitation, punishment and profit: The dismantling of public-sector probation

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/608589
Title:
Rehabilitation, punishment and profit: The dismantling of public-sector probation
Authors:
Teague, Michael
Abstract:
Probation has been nurtured and developed for over a century as the key cornerstone of our community justice system in England and Wales. However, a fundamental transformation in the way in which offenders are managed in the community is underway. After 106 years of rehabilitative intervention, the Probation Service is about to be dismantled - at least, in its traditional public sector incarnation. On 9 May 2013, Justice Secretary Chris Grayling formally confirmed the Conservative-Liberal Democratic coalition government's plans to privatise the majority of probation work by 2015. While few would argue with the principle of supporting rehabilitation, there was controversy over both how this could be achieved and which agencies might deliver it. The privatisation of probation was viewed as a key component of the government’s “rehabilitation revolution”.
Affiliation:
Teesside University
Citation:
Teague, M. (2013). 'Rehabilitation, punishment and profit: The dismantling of public-sector probation.' British Society of Criminology Newsletter(72): 15-19.
Publisher:
British Spciety of Criminology
Journal:
British Society of Criminology Newsletter
Issue Date:
Jun-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/608589
Additional Links:
http://britsoccrim.org/new/newdocs/bscn-72-2013-Teague.pdf; http://www.britsoccrim.org/publications/bscnewsletters/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1759-8354
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTeague, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-08T15:01:45Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-08T15:01:45Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06en
dc.identifier.citationTeague, M. (2013). 'Rehabilitation, punishment and profit: The dismantling of public-sector probation.' British Society of Criminology Newsletter(72): 15-19.en
dc.identifier.issn1759-8354en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/608589-
dc.description.abstractProbation has been nurtured and developed for over a century as the key cornerstone of our community justice system in England and Wales. However, a fundamental transformation in the way in which offenders are managed in the community is underway. After 106 years of rehabilitative intervention, the Probation Service is about to be dismantled - at least, in its traditional public sector incarnation. On 9 May 2013, Justice Secretary Chris Grayling formally confirmed the Conservative-Liberal Democratic coalition government's plans to privatise the majority of probation work by 2015. While few would argue with the principle of supporting rehabilitation, there was controversy over both how this could be achieved and which agencies might deliver it. The privatisation of probation was viewed as a key component of the government’s “rehabilitation revolution”.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Spciety of Criminologyen
dc.relation.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/608589en
dc.relation.urlhttp://britsoccrim.org/new/newdocs/bscn-72-2013-Teague.pdfen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.britsoccrim.org/publications/bscnewsletters/en
dc.subjectprobationen
dc.subjectrehabilitation revolutionen
dc.subjecttransforming rehabilitationen
dc.subjectprivatizationen
dc.titleRehabilitation, punishment and profit: The dismantling of public-sector probationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside Universityen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Society of Criminology Newsletteren
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