Parental self-efficacy in managing food allergy and mental health predicts food allergy related quality of life

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/604748
Title:
Parental self-efficacy in managing food allergy and mental health predicts food allergy related quality of life
Authors:
Knibb, Rebecca C. ( 0000-0001-5561-0904 ) ; Barnes, Christopher ( 0000-0001-8318-4412 ) ; Stalker, Carol ( 0000-0002-9734-9924 )
Abstract:
Food allergy has been shown to have a significant impact on quality of life (QoL) and can be difficult to manage in order to avoid potentially life threatening reactions. Parental self-efficacy (confidence) in managing food allergy for their child might explain variations in QoL. This study aimed to examine whether self-efficacy in parents of food allergic children was a good predictor of QoL of the family. Methods: Parents of children with clinically diagnosed food allergy completed the Food Allergy Self-Efficacy Scale for Parents (FASE-P), the Food Allergy Quality of Life Parental Burden Scale (FAQL-PB), the GHQ-12 (to measure mental health) and the Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM), which measures perceived likelihood of a severe allergic reaction. Results: A total of 434 parents took part. Greater parental QoL was significantly related to greater self-efficacy for food allergy management, better mental health, lower perceived likelihood of a severe reaction, older age in parent and child and fewer number of allergies (all p<0.05). Food allergy self-efficacy explained more of the variance in QoL than any other variable and self-efficacy related to management of social activities and precaution and prevention of an allergic reaction appeared to be the most important aspects. Conclusions: Parental self-efficacy in management of a child’s food allergy is important and is associated with better parental QoL. It would be useful to measure self-efficacy at visits to allergy clinic in order to focus support; interventions to improve self-efficacy in parents of food allergic children should be explored.
Affiliation:
Aston University; University of Derby; University of Derby
Citation:
Knibb, R., Barnes, C., and Stalker, C. (2016) Parental self-efficacy in managing food allergy and mental health predicts food allergy related quality of life, Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. 27 (5), pp. 459-464.
Journal:
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
Issue Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/604748
DOI:
10.1111/pai.12569
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/pai.12569
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
09056157
Sponsors:
This study was funded by pump priming money from the Health and Lifespan Research Group at Aston University.
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKnibb, Rebecca C.en
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorStalker, Carolen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T15:10:26Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-07T15:10:26Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03en
dc.identifier.citationKnibb, R., Barnes, C., and Stalker, C. (2016) Parental self-efficacy in managing food allergy and mental health predicts food allergy related quality of life, Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. 27 (5), pp. 459-464.en
dc.identifier.issn09056157en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/pai.12569en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/604748en
dc.description.abstractFood allergy has been shown to have a significant impact on quality of life (QoL) and can be difficult to manage in order to avoid potentially life threatening reactions. Parental self-efficacy (confidence) in managing food allergy for their child might explain variations in QoL. This study aimed to examine whether self-efficacy in parents of food allergic children was a good predictor of QoL of the family. Methods: Parents of children with clinically diagnosed food allergy completed the Food Allergy Self-Efficacy Scale for Parents (FASE-P), the Food Allergy Quality of Life Parental Burden Scale (FAQL-PB), the GHQ-12 (to measure mental health) and the Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM), which measures perceived likelihood of a severe allergic reaction. Results: A total of 434 parents took part. Greater parental QoL was significantly related to greater self-efficacy for food allergy management, better mental health, lower perceived likelihood of a severe reaction, older age in parent and child and fewer number of allergies (all p<0.05). Food allergy self-efficacy explained more of the variance in QoL than any other variable and self-efficacy related to management of social activities and precaution and prevention of an allergic reaction appeared to be the most important aspects. Conclusions: Parental self-efficacy in management of a child’s food allergy is important and is associated with better parental QoL. It would be useful to measure self-efficacy at visits to allergy clinic in order to focus support; interventions to improve self-efficacy in parents of food allergic children should be explored.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by pump priming money from the Health and Lifespan Research Group at Aston University.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/pai.12569en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pediatric Allergy and Immunologyen
dc.subjectFood allergyen
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen
dc.titleParental self-efficacy in managing food allergy and mental health predicts food allergy related quality of lifeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAston Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalPediatric Allergy and Immunologyen
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology, School of Life and Health Sciences; Aston University; Birmingham U.Ken
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology, College of Life and Natural Sciences; University of Derby; Derby U.Ken
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology, College of Life and Natural Sciences; University of Derby; Derby U.Ken
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