When is a face a face? Schematic faces, emotion, attention and the N170

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/595923
Title:
When is a face a face? Schematic faces, emotion, attention and the N170
Authors:
Maratos, Frances A. ( 0000-0001-5738-6491 ) ; Garner, Matthew ( 0000-0003-4565-1010 ) ; Karl, Anke ( 0000-0002-6472-2876 ) ; Hogan, Alexandra M.
Abstract:
Emotional facial expressions provide important non-verbal cues as to the imminent behavioural intentions of a second party. Hence, within emotion science the processing of faces (emotional or otherwise) has been at the forefront of research. Notably, however, such research has led to a number of debates including the ecological validity of utilising schematic faces in emotion research, and the face-selectively of N170. In order to investigate these issues, we explored the extent to which N170 is modulated by schematic faces, emotional expression and/or selective attention. Eighteen participants completed a three-stimulus oddball paradigm with two scrambled faces as the target and standard stimuli (counter-balanced across participants), and schematic angry, happy and neutral faces as the oddball stimuli. Results revealed that the magnitude of the N170 associated with the target stimulus was: (i) significantly greater than that elicited by the standard stimulus, (ii) comparable with the N170 elicited by the neutral and happy schematic face stimuli, and (iii) significantly reduced compared to the N170 elicited by the angry schematic face stimulus. These findings extend current literature by demonstrating N170 can be modulated by events other than those associated with structural face encoding; i.e. here, the act of labelling a stimulus a ‘target’ to attend to modulated the N170 response. Additionally, the observation that schematic faces demonstrate similar N170 responses to those recorded for real faces and, akin to real faces, angry schematic faces demonstrated heightened N170 responses, suggests caution should be taken before disregarding schematic facial stimuli in emotion processing research per se.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Maratos, F, Garner, M, Hogan, A, & Karl, A 2015, 'When is a Face a Face? Schematic Faces, Emotion, Attention and the N170', AIMS Neuroscience, 2, 3, p. 172
Publisher:
AIMS Press
Journal:
AIMS Neuroscience
Issue Date:
11-Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/595923
DOI:
10.3934/Neuroscience.2015.3.172
Additional Links:
http://www.aimspress.com/article/10.3934/Neuroscience.2015.3.172
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Vol. 2; Issue 3
ISSN:
2373-7972
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaratos, Frances A.en
dc.contributor.authorGarner, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorKarl, Ankeen
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Alexandra M.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-09T10:44:44Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-09T10:44:44Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09-11en
dc.identifier.citationMaratos, F, Garner, M, Hogan, A, & Karl, A 2015, 'When is a Face a Face? Schematic Faces, Emotion, Attention and the N170', AIMS Neuroscience, 2, 3, p. 172en
dc.identifier.issn2373-7972en
dc.identifier.doi10.3934/Neuroscience.2015.3.172en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/595923en
dc.description.abstractEmotional facial expressions provide important non-verbal cues as to the imminent behavioural intentions of a second party. Hence, within emotion science the processing of faces (emotional or otherwise) has been at the forefront of research. Notably, however, such research has led to a number of debates including the ecological validity of utilising schematic faces in emotion research, and the face-selectively of N170. In order to investigate these issues, we explored the extent to which N170 is modulated by schematic faces, emotional expression and/or selective attention. Eighteen participants completed a three-stimulus oddball paradigm with two scrambled faces as the target and standard stimuli (counter-balanced across participants), and schematic angry, happy and neutral faces as the oddball stimuli. Results revealed that the magnitude of the N170 associated with the target stimulus was: (i) significantly greater than that elicited by the standard stimulus, (ii) comparable with the N170 elicited by the neutral and happy schematic face stimuli, and (iii) significantly reduced compared to the N170 elicited by the angry schematic face stimulus. These findings extend current literature by demonstrating N170 can be modulated by events other than those associated with structural face encoding; i.e. here, the act of labelling a stimulus a ‘target’ to attend to modulated the N170 response. Additionally, the observation that schematic faces demonstrate similar N170 responses to those recorded for real faces and, akin to real faces, angry schematic faces demonstrated heightened N170 responses, suggests caution should be taken before disregarding schematic facial stimuli in emotion processing research per se.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAIMS Pressen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVol. 2en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 3en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.aimspress.com/article/10.3934/Neuroscience.2015.3.172en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to AIMS Neuroscienceen
dc.subjectN170en
dc.subjectSchematic facesen
dc.subjectEmotional expressionen
dc.subjectSelective attentionen
dc.subjectThreat superiorityen
dc.subjectEmotions (Psychology)en
dc.titleWhen is a face a face? Schematic faces, emotion, attention and the N170en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalAIMS Neuroscienceen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.