Will graduate entry free nursing from the shackles of class and gender oppression?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/595920
Title:
Will graduate entry free nursing from the shackles of class and gender oppression?
Authors:
Whitehead, Bill ( 0000-0002-6256-1976 )
Abstract:
Debates in nursing focus on the provision of good nursing care and its relation to academic status. For example, are nurses "too posh to wash" if they believe entry to the profession should require a degree, or is this a case of them having pretensions "above their station"? This article discusses the nature of oppression and its relationship to hierarchy, and concludes that nurses are oppressed through gender and socioeconomic class. It also examines the profession's social position, arguing thatthe majority of nurses identify with the most oppressed social class.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Whitehead, B 2010, 'Will graduate entry free nursing from the shackles of class and gender oppression?', Nursing Times, 106, 21, pp. 19-22
Publisher:
Macmillan Publishing Ltd.
Journal:
Nursing Times
Issue Date:
Jun-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/595920
PubMed ID:
20590041
Additional Links:
http://www.nursingtimes.net/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Vol. 106; Issue 21
ISSN:
0954-7762
Appears in Collections:
Department of Health Care Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhitehead, Billen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-09T10:07:20Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-09T10:07:20Zen
dc.date.issued2010-06en
dc.identifier.citationWhitehead, B 2010, 'Will graduate entry free nursing from the shackles of class and gender oppression?', Nursing Times, 106, 21, pp. 19-22en
dc.identifier.issn0954-7762en
dc.identifier.pmid20590041en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/595920en
dc.description.abstractDebates in nursing focus on the provision of good nursing care and its relation to academic status. For example, are nurses "too posh to wash" if they believe entry to the profession should require a degree, or is this a case of them having pretensions "above their station"? This article discusses the nature of oppression and its relationship to hierarchy, and concludes that nurses are oppressed through gender and socioeconomic class. It also examines the profession's social position, arguing thatthe majority of nurses identify with the most oppressed social class.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMacmillan Publishing Ltd.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVol. 106en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 21en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nursingtimes.net/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nursing timesen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectOppressionen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnelen
dc.subject.meshClinical Competenceen
dc.subject.meshDissent and Disputesen
dc.subject.meshEducation, Nursing, Baccalaureateen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFreedomen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshModels, Nursingen
dc.subject.meshNurse's Roleen
dc.subject.meshPower (Psychology)en
dc.subject.meshPrejudiceen
dc.subject.meshProfessional Autonomyen
dc.subject.meshSexual Harassmenten
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen
dc.subject.meshSocial Identificationen
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subject.meshWomen's Rightsen
dc.titleWill graduate entry free nursing from the shackles of class and gender oppression?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalNursing Timesen
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