A review of evidence about behavioural and psychological aspects of chronic joint pain among people with haemophilia

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/594804
Title:
A review of evidence about behavioural and psychological aspects of chronic joint pain among people with haemophilia
Authors:
Elander, James ( 0000-0001-7665-5482 )
Abstract:
Joint pain related to haemophilia affects large numbers of people and has a significant impact on their quality of life. This article reviews evidence about behavioural and psychological aspects of joint pain in haemophilia, and considers that evidence in the context of research on other chronic pain conditions. The aim is to inform initiatives to improve pain self-management among people with haemophilia. Reduced pain intensity predicts better physical quality of life, so better pain management should lead to improved physical quality of life. Increased pain acceptance predicts better mental quality of life, so acceptance-based approaches to self-management could potentially be adapted for people with haemophilia. Pain self-management interventions could include elements designed to: improve assessment of pain; increase understanding of the difference between acute and chronic pain; improve adherence to clotting factor treatment; improve knowledge and understanding about the benefits and costs of using pain medications; improve judgments about what is excessive use of pain medication; increase motivation to self-manage pain; reduce negative emotional thinking about pain; and increase pain acceptance. The influence of behavioural and psychological factors related to pain are similar in haemophilia and other chronic pain conditions, so there should be scope for self-management approaches and interventions developed for other chronic pain conditions to be adapted for haemophilia, provided that careful account is taken of the need to respond promptly to acute bleeding pain by administering clotting factor.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Elander, J. (2014) 'A review of evidence about behavioural and psychological aspects of chronic joint pain among people with haemophilia', Haemophilia, 20 (2):168. DOI: 10.1111/hae.12291
Journal:
Haemophilia
Issue Date:
Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/594804
DOI:
10.1111/hae.12291
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/hae.12291
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
13518216
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorElander, Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T14:31:23Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-25T14:31:23Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03en
dc.identifier.citationElander, J. (2014) 'A review of evidence about behavioural and psychological aspects of chronic joint pain among people with haemophilia', Haemophilia, 20 (2):168. DOI: 10.1111/hae.12291en
dc.identifier.issn13518216en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/hae.12291en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/594804en
dc.description.abstractJoint pain related to haemophilia affects large numbers of people and has a significant impact on their quality of life. This article reviews evidence about behavioural and psychological aspects of joint pain in haemophilia, and considers that evidence in the context of research on other chronic pain conditions. The aim is to inform initiatives to improve pain self-management among people with haemophilia. Reduced pain intensity predicts better physical quality of life, so better pain management should lead to improved physical quality of life. Increased pain acceptance predicts better mental quality of life, so acceptance-based approaches to self-management could potentially be adapted for people with haemophilia. Pain self-management interventions could include elements designed to: improve assessment of pain; increase understanding of the difference between acute and chronic pain; improve adherence to clotting factor treatment; improve knowledge and understanding about the benefits and costs of using pain medications; improve judgments about what is excessive use of pain medication; increase motivation to self-manage pain; reduce negative emotional thinking about pain; and increase pain acceptance. The influence of behavioural and psychological factors related to pain are similar in haemophilia and other chronic pain conditions, so there should be scope for self-management approaches and interventions developed for other chronic pain conditions to be adapted for haemophilia, provided that careful account is taken of the need to respond promptly to acute bleeding pain by administering clotting factor.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/hae.12291en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Haemophiliaen
dc.subjectChronic joint painen
dc.subjectHaemophiliaen
dc.titleA review of evidence about behavioural and psychological aspects of chronic joint pain among people with haemophiliaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalHaemophiliaen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Derby; Derby UKen
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