Attentional biases towards familiar and unfamiliar foods in children. The role of food neophobia

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/594803
Title:
Attentional biases towards familiar and unfamiliar foods in children. The role of food neophobia
Authors:
Maratos, Frances A. ( 0000-0001-5738-6491 ) ; Staples, Paul
Abstract:
Familiarity of food stimuli is one factor that has been proposed to explain food preferences and food neophobia in children, with some research suggesting that food neophobia (and familiarity) is at first a predominant of the visual domain. Considering visual attentional biases are a key factor implicated in a majority of fear-related phobias/anxieties, the purpose of this research was to investigate attentional biases to familiar and unfamiliar fruit and vegetables in 8 to 11 year old children with differing levels of food neophobia. To this end, 70 primary aged children completed a visual-probe task measuring attentional biases towards familiar and unfamiliar fruit/vegetables, as well as the food neophobia, general neophobia and willingness to try self-report measures. Results revealed that as an undifferentiated population all children appeared to demonstrate an attentional bias toward the unfamiliar fruit and vegetable stimuli. However, when considering food neophobia, this bias was significantly exaggerated for children self-reporting high food neophobia and negligible for children self-reporting low food neophobia. In addition, willingness to try the food stimuli was inversely correlated with attentional bias toward the unfamiliar fruits/vegetables. Our results demonstrate that visual aspects of food stimuli (e.g. familiarity) play an important role in childhood food neophobia. This study provides the first empirical test of recent theory/models of food neophobia (e.g. Brown & Harris, 2012). Findings are discussed in light of these models and related anxiety models, along with implications concerning the treatment of childhood food neophobia.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Maratos, F. A. and Staples, P. (2015) 'Attentional biases towards familiar and unfamiliar foods in children. The role of food neophobia', Appetite, 91:220. DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.04.003
Journal:
Appetite
Issue Date:
Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/594803
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2015.04.003
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195666315001427
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
01956663
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaratos, Frances A.en
dc.contributor.authorStaples, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T14:28:54Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-25T14:28:54Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08en
dc.identifier.citationMaratos, F. A. and Staples, P. (2015) 'Attentional biases towards familiar and unfamiliar foods in children. The role of food neophobia', Appetite, 91:220. DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.04.003en
dc.identifier.issn01956663en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.appet.2015.04.003en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/594803en
dc.description.abstractFamiliarity of food stimuli is one factor that has been proposed to explain food preferences and food neophobia in children, with some research suggesting that food neophobia (and familiarity) is at first a predominant of the visual domain. Considering visual attentional biases are a key factor implicated in a majority of fear-related phobias/anxieties, the purpose of this research was to investigate attentional biases to familiar and unfamiliar fruit and vegetables in 8 to 11 year old children with differing levels of food neophobia. To this end, 70 primary aged children completed a visual-probe task measuring attentional biases towards familiar and unfamiliar fruit/vegetables, as well as the food neophobia, general neophobia and willingness to try self-report measures. Results revealed that as an undifferentiated population all children appeared to demonstrate an attentional bias toward the unfamiliar fruit and vegetable stimuli. However, when considering food neophobia, this bias was significantly exaggerated for children self-reporting high food neophobia and negligible for children self-reporting low food neophobia. In addition, willingness to try the food stimuli was inversely correlated with attentional bias toward the unfamiliar fruits/vegetables. Our results demonstrate that visual aspects of food stimuli (e.g. familiarity) play an important role in childhood food neophobia. This study provides the first empirical test of recent theory/models of food neophobia (e.g. Brown & Harris, 2012). Findings are discussed in light of these models and related anxiety models, along with implications concerning the treatment of childhood food neophobia.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195666315001427en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Appetiteen
dc.subjectFood neophobiaen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectAttentional biasesen
dc.subjectFamiliar and unfamiliar foodsen
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.subjectNoveltyen
dc.titleAttentional biases towards familiar and unfamiliar foods in children. The role of food neophobiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalAppetiteen
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