Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/584265
Title:
Cryptic female choice in crickets and relatives (Orthoptera: Ensifera)
Authors:
Vahed, Karim
Abstract:
In his pioneering work on cryptic female choice , Eberhard identified a wide range of mechanisms that potentially allow multiply-mated females to bias paternity in favour of certain types of male following the start of copulation. The aim of this chapter is to review critically the empirical evidence for a range of these mechanisms of cryptic female choice in crickets and relatives (Orthoptera : Ensifera ), while taking into account coevolutionary interactions between the sexes. There is compelling evidence that female crickets control the duration of spermatophore attachment and/or the uptake of sperm to the sperm storage organ to bias paternity in favour of males expressing a variety of favourable traits, or in favour of non-kin males. There is also some evidence that females can bias paternity to favour males with certain traits by choosing to remain with them for repeated mating. For other potential mechanisms of cryptic female choice, such as differential allocation of resources to the production of eggs, there is currently insufficient evidence to distinguish male-induced effects from cryptic female choice (if, indeed, such a distinction can be made). The evidence that mechanisms of cryptic female choice have resulted in coevolutionary adaptations in males is strong: males have evolved a wide range of behaviours to facilitate ejaculate transfer by deterring the female from removing the ampulla of the spermatophore prematurely, for example. How such adaptations affect the form and intensity of cryptic female choice and whether or not they result in ongoing sexually antagonistic coevolution deserve further investigation.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Vahed, K. (2015) 'Cryptic female choice in crickets and relatives (Orthoptera: Ensifera)' in Peretti, A. V. and Aisenberg, A. (eds). 'Cryptic Female Choice in Arthropods: Patterns, Mechanisms and Prospects', Springer, London, pp 285-324
Publisher:
Springer
Issue Date:
26-May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/584265
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-17894-3_11
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-17894-3_11
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
978-3-319-17893-6; 978-3-319-17894-3
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Sustainability Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVahed, Karimen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T09:38:52Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-21T09:38:52Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-26en
dc.identifier.citationVahed, K. (2015) 'Cryptic female choice in crickets and relatives (Orthoptera: Ensifera)' in Peretti, A. V. and Aisenberg, A. (eds). 'Cryptic Female Choice in Arthropods: Patterns, Mechanisms and Prospects', Springer, London, pp 285-324en
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-17893-6en
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-17894-3en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-17894-3_11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/584265en
dc.description.abstractIn his pioneering work on cryptic female choice , Eberhard identified a wide range of mechanisms that potentially allow multiply-mated females to bias paternity in favour of certain types of male following the start of copulation. The aim of this chapter is to review critically the empirical evidence for a range of these mechanisms of cryptic female choice in crickets and relatives (Orthoptera : Ensifera ), while taking into account coevolutionary interactions between the sexes. There is compelling evidence that female crickets control the duration of spermatophore attachment and/or the uptake of sperm to the sperm storage organ to bias paternity in favour of males expressing a variety of favourable traits, or in favour of non-kin males. There is also some evidence that females can bias paternity to favour males with certain traits by choosing to remain with them for repeated mating. For other potential mechanisms of cryptic female choice, such as differential allocation of resources to the production of eggs, there is currently insufficient evidence to distinguish male-induced effects from cryptic female choice (if, indeed, such a distinction can be made). The evidence that mechanisms of cryptic female choice have resulted in coevolutionary adaptations in males is strong: males have evolved a wide range of behaviours to facilitate ejaculate transfer by deterring the female from removing the ampulla of the spermatophore prematurely, for example. How such adaptations affect the form and intensity of cryptic female choice and whether or not they result in ongoing sexually antagonistic coevolution deserve further investigation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-17894-3_11en
dc.subjectCryptic female choiceen
dc.subjectSexual selectionen
dc.titleCryptic female choice in crickets and relatives (Orthoptera: Ensifera)en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
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