Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/583349
Title:
Decadal environmental ‘memory’ in a reef coral?
Authors:
Brown, Barbara E. ( 0000-0001-5416-3970 ) ; Dunne, Richard P.; Edwards, Alasdair J.; Sweet, Michael J. ( 0000-0003-4983-8333 ) ; Phongsuwan, Niphon
Abstract:
West sides of the coral Coelastrea aspera, which had achieved thermo-tolerance after previous experience of high solar irradiance in the field, were rotated through 180o on a reef flat in Phuket, Thailand (7o50´N, 98o25.5´E), in 2000 in a manipulation experiment and secured in this position. In 2010, elevated sea temperatures caused extreme bleaching in these corals, with former west sides of colonies (now facing east) retaining four times higher symbiont densities than the east sides of control colonies, which had not been rotated and which had been subject to a lower irradiance environment than west sides throughout their lifetime. The reduced bleaching susceptibility of the former west sides in 2010, compared to handling controls, suggests that the rotated corals had retained a ‘memory’ of their previous high irradiance history despite living under lower irradiance for 10 years. Such long-term retention of an environmental ‘memory’ raises important questions about the acclimatisation potential of reef corals in a changing climate and the mechanisms by which it is achieved.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Brown, B, Dunne, R, Edwards, A, Sweet, M, & Phongsuwan, N 2015, 'Decadal environmental 'memory' in a reef coral?', Marine Biology, 2, p. 479
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Marine Biology
Issue Date:
12-Dec-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/583349
DOI:
10.1007/s00227-014-2596-2
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00227-014-2596-2
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Vol. 162; Issue 2
ISSN:
0025-3162; 1432-1793
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Barbara E.en
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Richard P.en
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Alasdair J.en
dc.contributor.authorSweet, Michael J.en
dc.contributor.authorPhongsuwan, Niphonen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T20:44:25Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-07T20:44:25Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12-12en
dc.identifier.citationBrown, B, Dunne, R, Edwards, A, Sweet, M, & Phongsuwan, N 2015, 'Decadal environmental 'memory' in a reef coral?', Marine Biology, 2, p. 479en
dc.identifier.issn0025-3162en
dc.identifier.issn1432-1793en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00227-014-2596-2en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/583349en
dc.description.abstractWest sides of the coral Coelastrea aspera, which had achieved thermo-tolerance after previous experience of high solar irradiance in the field, were rotated through 180o on a reef flat in Phuket, Thailand (7o50´N, 98o25.5´E), in 2000 in a manipulation experiment and secured in this position. In 2010, elevated sea temperatures caused extreme bleaching in these corals, with former west sides of colonies (now facing east) retaining four times higher symbiont densities than the east sides of control colonies, which had not been rotated and which had been subject to a lower irradiance environment than west sides throughout their lifetime. The reduced bleaching susceptibility of the former west sides in 2010, compared to handling controls, suggests that the rotated corals had retained a ‘memory’ of their previous high irradiance history despite living under lower irradiance for 10 years. Such long-term retention of an environmental ‘memory’ raises important questions about the acclimatisation potential of reef corals in a changing climate and the mechanisms by which it is achieved.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVol. 162en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 2en
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00227-014-2596-2en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Marine Biologyen
dc.subjectCoral reefen
dc.subjectBleachingen
dc.titleDecadal environmental ‘memory’ in a reef coral?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalMarine Biologyen
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