Diseases in marine invertebrates associated with mariculture and commercial fisheries

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/583348
Title:
Diseases in marine invertebrates associated with mariculture and commercial fisheries
Authors:
Sweet, Michael J. ( 0000-0003-4983-8333 ) ; Bateman, Kelly S.
Abstract:
Diseases in marine invertebrates are increasing in both frequency and intensity around the globe. Diseases in individuals which offer some commercial value are often well documented and subsequently well studied in comparison to those wild groups offering little commercial gain. This is particularly the case with those associated with mariculture or the commercial fisheries. Specifically, these include many Holothuroidea, and numerous crustacea and mollusca species. Pathogens/parasites consisting of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes from all groups have been associated with diseases from such organisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. Viral pathogens in particular, appear to be an increasingly important group and research into this group will likely highlight a larger number of diseases and pathogens being described in the near future. Interestingly, although there are countless examples of the spread of disease usually associated with transportation of specific infected hosts for development of aquaculture practices, this process appears to be continuing with no real sign of effective management and mitigation strategies being implicated. Notably, even in well developed countries such as the UK and the US, even though live animal trade may be well managed, the transport of frozen food appears to be less well so and as evidence suggests, even these to have the potential to transmit pathogens when used as a food source for example.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Sweet, M, & Bateman, K 2015, 'Diseases in marine invertebrates associated with mariculture and commercial fisheries', Journal Of Sea Research
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Journal of Sea Research
Issue Date:
Oct-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/583348
DOI:
10.1016/j.seares.2015.06.016
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1385110115300186
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Vol. 104
ISSN:
13851101
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSweet, Michael J.en
dc.contributor.authorBateman, Kelly S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T20:14:47Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-07T20:14:47Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10en
dc.identifier.citationSweet, M, & Bateman, K 2015, 'Diseases in marine invertebrates associated with mariculture and commercial fisheries', Journal Of Sea Researchen
dc.identifier.issn13851101en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.seares.2015.06.016en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/583348en
dc.description.abstractDiseases in marine invertebrates are increasing in both frequency and intensity around the globe. Diseases in individuals which offer some commercial value are often well documented and subsequently well studied in comparison to those wild groups offering little commercial gain. This is particularly the case with those associated with mariculture or the commercial fisheries. Specifically, these include many Holothuroidea, and numerous crustacea and mollusca species. Pathogens/parasites consisting of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes from all groups have been associated with diseases from such organisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. Viral pathogens in particular, appear to be an increasingly important group and research into this group will likely highlight a larger number of diseases and pathogens being described in the near future. Interestingly, although there are countless examples of the spread of disease usually associated with transportation of specific infected hosts for development of aquaculture practices, this process appears to be continuing with no real sign of effective management and mitigation strategies being implicated. Notably, even in well developed countries such as the UK and the US, even though live animal trade may be well managed, the transport of frozen food appears to be less well so and as evidence suggests, even these to have the potential to transmit pathogens when used as a food source for example.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVol. 104en
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1385110115300186en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Sea Researchen
dc.subjectMarine biologyen
dc.subjectInvertebratesen
dc.subjectSea cucumberen
dc.subjectMolluscaen
dc.subjectCrustaceaen
dc.subjectBacteriaen
dc.subjectVirusen
dc.subjectPhageen
dc.titleDiseases in marine invertebrates associated with mariculture and commercial fisheriesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sea Researchen
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