Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/583346
Title:
Ciliate communities consistently associated with coral diseases
Authors:
Sweet, Michael J. ( 0000-0003-4983-8333 ) ; Séré, Mathieu G.
Abstract:
Incidences of coral disease are increasing. Most studies which focus on diseases in these organisms routinely assess variations in bacterial associates. However, other microorganism groups such as viruses, fungi and protozoa are only recently starting to receive attention. This study aimed at assessing the diversity of ciliates associated with coral diseases over a wide geographical range. Here we show that a wide variety of ciliates are associated with all nine coral diseases assessed. Many of these ciliates such as Trochilia petrani and Glauconema trihymene feed on the bacteria which are likely colonizing the bare skeleton exposed by the advancing disease lesion or the necrotic tissue itself. Others such as Pseudokeronopsis and Licnophora macfarlandi are common predators of other protozoans and will be attracted by the increase in other ciliate species to the lesion interface. However, a few ciliate species (namely Varistrombidium kielum, Philaster lucinda, Philaster guamense, a Euplotes sp., a Trachelotractus sp. and a Condylostoma sp.) appear to harbor symbiotic algae, potentially from the coral themselves, a result which may indicate that they play some role in the disease pathology at the very least. Although, from this study alone we are not able to discern what roles any of these ciliates play in disease causation, the consistent presence of such communities with disease lesion interfaces warrants further investigation.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Sweet, M, & Séré, M 2015, 'Ciliate communities consistently associated with coral diseases', Journal Of Sea Research, Vol. 113, pp. 119-131.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Journal of Sea Research
Issue Date:
Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/583346
DOI:
10.1016/j.seares.2015.06.008
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1385110115300095
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
13851101
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSweet, Michael J.en
dc.contributor.authorSéré, Mathieu G.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T18:42:57Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-07T18:42:57Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06en
dc.identifier.citationSweet, M, & Séré, M 2015, 'Ciliate communities consistently associated with coral diseases', Journal Of Sea Research, Vol. 113, pp. 119-131.en
dc.identifier.issn13851101en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.seares.2015.06.008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/583346en
dc.description.abstractIncidences of coral disease are increasing. Most studies which focus on diseases in these organisms routinely assess variations in bacterial associates. However, other microorganism groups such as viruses, fungi and protozoa are only recently starting to receive attention. This study aimed at assessing the diversity of ciliates associated with coral diseases over a wide geographical range. Here we show that a wide variety of ciliates are associated with all nine coral diseases assessed. Many of these ciliates such as Trochilia petrani and Glauconema trihymene feed on the bacteria which are likely colonizing the bare skeleton exposed by the advancing disease lesion or the necrotic tissue itself. Others such as Pseudokeronopsis and Licnophora macfarlandi are common predators of other protozoans and will be attracted by the increase in other ciliate species to the lesion interface. However, a few ciliate species (namely Varistrombidium kielum, Philaster lucinda, Philaster guamense, a Euplotes sp., a Trachelotractus sp. and a Condylostoma sp.) appear to harbor symbiotic algae, potentially from the coral themselves, a result which may indicate that they play some role in the disease pathology at the very least. Although, from this study alone we are not able to discern what roles any of these ciliates play in disease causation, the consistent presence of such communities with disease lesion interfaces warrants further investigation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1385110115300095en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Sea Researchen
dc.subjectCoral reefen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectCiliatesen
dc.subjectPhilasteren
dc.titleCiliate communities consistently associated with coral diseasesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sea Researchen
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