Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/583124
Title:
Habitat quality affects sound production and likely distance of detection on coral reefs
Authors:
Piercy, Julius J. B.; Codling, Edward A.; Hill, Adam J.; Smith, David J.; Simpson, Stephen D.
Abstract:
The interwoven nature of habitats and their acoustic fingerprints (soundscapes) is being increasingly recognized as a key component of animal ecology. Natural soundscapes are crucial for orientation in many different taxa when seeking suitable breeding grounds or settlement habitats. In the marine environment, coral reef noise is an important navigation cue for settling reef fish larvae and is thus a possible driver of reef population dynamics. We explored reef noise across a gradient of reef qualities, tested sound propagation models against field recordings and combined them with fish audio grams to demonstrate the importance of reef quality in determining which reefs larvae are likely to detect. We found that higher-quality reefs were significantly louder and richer in acoustic events (transient content) than degraded reefs, and observed that sound propagated farther with less attenuation than predicted by classic models. We discuss how zones of detection of poor-quality reefs could be reduced by over an order of magnitude com-pared to healthy reefs. The present study provides new perspectives on the far reaching effects habitat degradation may have on organisms that utilize soundscapes for orientation towards or away from coral reefs, and highlights the value of sound recordings as a cost-effective reef survey and monitoring tool.
Affiliation:
University of Essex; University of Derby; University of Exeter
Citation:
Piercy JJB, Codling EA, Hill AJ, Smith DJ, Simpson SD (2014) Habitat quality affects sound production and likely distance of detection on coral reefs. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 516:35-47. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps10986
Journal:
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Issue Date:
13-Dec-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/583124
DOI:
10.3354/meps10986
Additional Links:
http://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v516/p35-47/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0171-8630; 1616-1599
Appears in Collections:
Department of Mechanical Engineering & the Built Environment

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPiercy, Julius J. B.en
dc.contributor.authorCodling, Edward A.en
dc.contributor.authorHill, Adam J.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, David J.en
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Stephen D.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-02T09:52:51Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-02T09:52:51Zen
dc.date.issued2012-12-13-
dc.identifier.citationPiercy JJB, Codling EA, Hill AJ, Smith DJ, Simpson SD (2014) Habitat quality affects sound production and likely distance of detection on coral reefs. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 516:35-47. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps10986en
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630-
dc.identifier.issn1616-1599-
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps10986-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/583124-
dc.description.abstractThe interwoven nature of habitats and their acoustic fingerprints (soundscapes) is being increasingly recognized as a key component of animal ecology. Natural soundscapes are crucial for orientation in many different taxa when seeking suitable breeding grounds or settlement habitats. In the marine environment, coral reef noise is an important navigation cue for settling reef fish larvae and is thus a possible driver of reef population dynamics. We explored reef noise across a gradient of reef qualities, tested sound propagation models against field recordings and combined them with fish audio grams to demonstrate the importance of reef quality in determining which reefs larvae are likely to detect. We found that higher-quality reefs were significantly louder and richer in acoustic events (transient content) than degraded reefs, and observed that sound propagated farther with less attenuation than predicted by classic models. We discuss how zones of detection of poor-quality reefs could be reduced by over an order of magnitude com-pared to healthy reefs. The present study provides new perspectives on the far reaching effects habitat degradation may have on organisms that utilize soundscapes for orientation towards or away from coral reefs, and highlights the value of sound recordings as a cost-effective reef survey and monitoring tool.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v516/p35-47/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Marine Ecology Progress Seriesen
dc.subjectUnderwateren
dc.subjectAcousticsen
dc.subjectCoral reefen
dc.subjectMarine biologyen
dc.titleHabitat quality affects sound production and likely distance of detection on coral reefsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Essexen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Exeteren
dc.identifier.journalMarine Ecology Progress Seriesen
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