Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/582826
Title:
Conformity, deformity and reformity
Authors:
Brown, Michael ( 0000-0003-0689-5266 ) ; Wilson, Chris
Abstract:
In any given field of artistic practice, practitioners position themselves—or find themselves positioned—according to interests and allegiances with specific movements, genres, and traditions. Selecting particular frameworks through which to approach the development of new ideas, patterns and expressions, balance is invariably maintained between the desire to contribute towards and connect with a particular set of domain conventions, whilst at the same time developing distinction and recognition as a creative individual. Creativity through the constraints of artistic domain, discipline and style provides a basis for consideration of notions of originality in the context of activity primarily associated with reconfiguration, manipulation and reorganisation of existing elements and ideas. Drawing from postmodern and post-structuralist perspectives in the analysis of modern hybrid art forms and the emergence of virtual creative environments, the transition from traditional artistic practice and notions of craft and creation, to creative spaces in which elements are manipulated, mutated, combined and distorted with often frivolous or subversive intent are considered. This paper presents an educational and musically focused perspective of the relationship between the individual and domain-based creative practice. Drawing primarily from musical and audio-visual examples with particular interest in creative disruption of pre-existing elements, creative strategies of appropriation and recycling are explored in the context of music composition and production. Conclusions focus on the interpretation of creativity as essentially a process of recombination and manipulation and highlight how the relationship between artist and field of practice creates unique creative spaces through which new ideas emerge.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Brown, M. & Wilson, C. (2015) 'Conformity, deformity and reformity', Conference Proceedings, West East Institute, 8-10th June 2015, Harvard University, Cambridge, Boston, USA
Publisher:
West East Institute
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/582826
Additional Links:
http://www.westeastinstitute.com/proceedings/2015-harvard-presentations/
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Creative Technologies Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Chrisen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-27T13:19:55Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-27T13:19:55Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationBrown, M. & Wilson, C. (2015) 'Conformity, deformity and reformity', Conference Proceedings, West East Institute, 8-10th June 2015, Harvard University, Cambridge, Boston, USAen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/582826en
dc.description.abstractIn any given field of artistic practice, practitioners position themselves—or find themselves positioned—according to interests and allegiances with specific movements, genres, and traditions. Selecting particular frameworks through which to approach the development of new ideas, patterns and expressions, balance is invariably maintained between the desire to contribute towards and connect with a particular set of domain conventions, whilst at the same time developing distinction and recognition as a creative individual. Creativity through the constraints of artistic domain, discipline and style provides a basis for consideration of notions of originality in the context of activity primarily associated with reconfiguration, manipulation and reorganisation of existing elements and ideas. Drawing from postmodern and post-structuralist perspectives in the analysis of modern hybrid art forms and the emergence of virtual creative environments, the transition from traditional artistic practice and notions of craft and creation, to creative spaces in which elements are manipulated, mutated, combined and distorted with often frivolous or subversive intent are considered. This paper presents an educational and musically focused perspective of the relationship between the individual and domain-based creative practice. Drawing primarily from musical and audio-visual examples with particular interest in creative disruption of pre-existing elements, creative strategies of appropriation and recycling are explored in the context of music composition and production. Conclusions focus on the interpretation of creativity as essentially a process of recombination and manipulation and highlight how the relationship between artist and field of practice creates unique creative spaces through which new ideas emerge.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWest East Instituteen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.westeastinstitute.com/proceedings/2015-harvard-presentations/en
dc.subjectCreativityen
dc.subjectMusicen
dc.subjectHigher educationen
dc.subjectDomainen
dc.titleConformity, deformity and reformityen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
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