Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/346457
Title:
Care at the end of life: how policy and the law support practice
Authors:
Brown, Michelle; Vaughan, Carol
Abstract:
The End of Life Care Strategy was introduced in an attempt to achieve a high standard of care for patients nearing the end of life and to improve carer experience. This high standard should not depend on socioeconomic status, geographical location or diagnosis. It was to ensure that individuals felt supported, informed and empowered, and that symptoms and issues were managed by experienced staff who employ evidenced-based practice. In addition, the service provision should involve a multidisciplinary team and have the patient at the centre of all decision-making. This would be facilitated by endorsing the use of end-of-life care pathways. These recommendations are further supported by frameworks and policies, for example the Preferred Priorities for Care Gold Standards Framework in Primary Care. Health professionals must also be cognisant of the legal frameworks that protect patients and facilitate their rights to exert their autonomy, for example the Mental Capacity Act and advanced directives. The issues surrounding care at the end of life with respect to legal frameworks alongside ethical and moral dilemmas will be further explored within this discussion paper.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Brown, M., & Vaughan, C. (2013). Care at the end of life: how policy and the law support practice. British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), 22(10), 580-583.
Publisher:
Mark Allen Healthcare
Journal:
British Journal of Nursing
Issue Date:
16-Aug-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/346457
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social & Community Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Michelleen
dc.contributor.authorVaughan, Carolen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-10T10:41:31Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-10T10:41:31Zen
dc.date.issued2013-08-16en
dc.identifier.citationBrown, M., & Vaughan, C. (2013). Care at the end of life: how policy and the law support practice. British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), 22(10), 580-583.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/346457en
dc.description.abstractThe End of Life Care Strategy was introduced in an attempt to achieve a high standard of care for patients nearing the end of life and to improve carer experience. This high standard should not depend on socioeconomic status, geographical location or diagnosis. It was to ensure that individuals felt supported, informed and empowered, and that symptoms and issues were managed by experienced staff who employ evidenced-based practice. In addition, the service provision should involve a multidisciplinary team and have the patient at the centre of all decision-making. This would be facilitated by endorsing the use of end-of-life care pathways. These recommendations are further supported by frameworks and policies, for example the Preferred Priorities for Care Gold Standards Framework in Primary Care. Health professionals must also be cognisant of the legal frameworks that protect patients and facilitate their rights to exert their autonomy, for example the Mental Capacity Act and advanced directives. The issues surrounding care at the end of life with respect to legal frameworks alongside ethical and moral dilemmas will be further explored within this discussion paper.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Healthcareen
dc.subjectEnd of life careen
dc.subjectPolicyen
dc.subjectQuality of careen
dc.subjectLegal conceptsen
dc.titleCare at the end of life: how policy and the law support practiceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Nursingen
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