Changing the subject: the educational implications of developing emotional well‐being

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/305397
Title:
Changing the subject: the educational implications of developing emotional well‐being
Authors:
Ecclestone, Kathryn; Hayes, Dennis ( 0000-0003-0073-6934 )
Abstract:
Claims that emotional well‐being is synonymous with successful educational practices and outcomes resonate with contemporary political portrayal of well‐being as integral to ‘social justice’. In Britain, diverse concerns are creating an ad hoc array of therapeutic interventions to develop and assess attributes, dispositions and attitudes associated with emotional well‐being, alongside growing calls to harness subject content and teaching activities as vehicles for a widening array of affective outcomes. There has been little public or academic debate about the educational implications of these developments for the aspirations of liberal humanist education. This article addresses this gap. Drawing on philosophical, political and sociological studies, it explores how preoccupation with emotional well‐being attacks the ‘subject’ in two inter‐related senses; the human subject and subject knowledge. It argues that it is essential to challenge claims and assumptions about well‐being and the government‐sponsored academic, professional and commercial industry which promotes them.
Affiliation:
Oxford Brookes University
Citation:
Changing the subject: the educational implications of developing emotional well‐being 2009, 35 (3):371 Oxford Review of Education
Journal:
Oxford Review of Education
Issue Date:
May-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/305397
DOI:
10.1080/03054980902934662
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03054980902934662
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0305-4985; 1465-3915
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Educational Research and Innovation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEcclestone, Kathrynen
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Dennisen
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-14T16:42:25Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-14T16:42:25Z-
dc.date.issued2009-05-
dc.identifier.citationChanging the subject: the educational implications of developing emotional well‐being 2009, 35 (3):371 Oxford Review of Educationen
dc.identifier.issn0305-4985-
dc.identifier.issn1465-3915-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03054980902934662-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/305397-
dc.description.abstractClaims that emotional well‐being is synonymous with successful educational practices and outcomes resonate with contemporary political portrayal of well‐being as integral to ‘social justice’. In Britain, diverse concerns are creating an ad hoc array of therapeutic interventions to develop and assess attributes, dispositions and attitudes associated with emotional well‐being, alongside growing calls to harness subject content and teaching activities as vehicles for a widening array of affective outcomes. There has been little public or academic debate about the educational implications of these developments for the aspirations of liberal humanist education. This article addresses this gap. Drawing on philosophical, political and sociological studies, it explores how preoccupation with emotional well‐being attacks the ‘subject’ in two inter‐related senses; the human subject and subject knowledge. It argues that it is essential to challenge claims and assumptions about well‐being and the government‐sponsored academic, professional and commercial industry which promotes them.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03054980902934662en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Oxford Review of Educationen
dc.subjectTherapeutic educationen
dc.subjectDiminished subjecten
dc.titleChanging the subject: the educational implications of developing emotional well‐beingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentOxford Brookes Universityen
dc.identifier.journalOxford Review of Educationen
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.