Using GPS telemetry to validate least-cost modeling of gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis) movement within a fragmented landscape

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/305105
Title:
Using GPS telemetry to validate least-cost modeling of gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis) movement within a fragmented landscape
Authors:
Stevenson, Claire D.; Ferryman, Mark; Nevin, Owen T.; Ramsey, Andrew ( 0000-0002-5550-9977 ) ; Bailey, Sallie; Watts, Kevin
Abstract:
In Britain, the population of native red squirrels Sciurus vulgaris has suffered population declines and local extinctions. Interspecific resource competition and disease spread by the invasive gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis are the main factors behind the decline. Gray squirrels have adapted to the British landscape so efficiently that they are widely distributed. Knowledge on how gray squirrels are using the landscape matrix and being able to predict their movements will aid management. This study is the first to use global positioning system (GPS) collars on wild gray squirrels to accurately record movements and land cover use within the landscape matrix. This data were used to validate Geographical Information System (GIS) least-cost model predictions of movements and provided much needed information on gray squirrel movement pathways and network use. Buffered least-cost paths and least-cost corridors provide predictions of the most probable movements through the landscape and are seen to perform better than the more expansive least-cost networks which include all possible movements. Applying the knowledge and methodologies gained to current gray squirrel expansion areas, such as Scotland and in Italy, will aid in the prediction of potential movement areas and therefore management of the invasive gray squirrel. The methodologies presented in this study could potentially be used in any landscape and on numerous species.
Affiliation:
University of Cumbria; Forest Research UK
Citation:
Using GPS telemetry to validate least-cost modeling of gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis) movement within a fragmented landscape 2013, 3 (7):2350 Ecology and Evolution
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Ecology and Evolution
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/305105
DOI:
10.1002/ece3.638
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ece3.638
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
least-cost modelling; telemetry; squirrel; woodland; conservation
ISSN:
20457758
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Claire D.en
dc.contributor.authorFerryman, Marken
dc.contributor.authorNevin, Owen T.en
dc.contributor.authorRamsey, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Sallieen
dc.contributor.authorWatts, Kevinen
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-07T20:15:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-07T20:15:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationUsing GPS telemetry to validate least-cost modeling of gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis) movement within a fragmented landscape 2013, 3 (7):2350 Ecology and Evolutionen
dc.identifier.issn20457758-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.638-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/305105-
dc.description.abstractIn Britain, the population of native red squirrels Sciurus vulgaris has suffered population declines and local extinctions. Interspecific resource competition and disease spread by the invasive gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis are the main factors behind the decline. Gray squirrels have adapted to the British landscape so efficiently that they are widely distributed. Knowledge on how gray squirrels are using the landscape matrix and being able to predict their movements will aid management. This study is the first to use global positioning system (GPS) collars on wild gray squirrels to accurately record movements and land cover use within the landscape matrix. This data were used to validate Geographical Information System (GIS) least-cost model predictions of movements and provided much needed information on gray squirrel movement pathways and network use. Buffered least-cost paths and least-cost corridors provide predictions of the most probable movements through the landscape and are seen to perform better than the more expansive least-cost networks which include all possible movements. Applying the knowledge and methodologies gained to current gray squirrel expansion areas, such as Scotland and in Italy, will aid in the prediction of potential movement areas and therefore management of the invasive gray squirrel. The methodologies presented in this study could potentially be used in any landscape and on numerous species.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesleast-cost modellingen
dc.relation.ispartofseriestelemetryen
dc.relation.ispartofseriessquirrelen
dc.relation.ispartofserieswoodlanden
dc.relation.ispartofseriesconservationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ece3.638en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Ecology and Evolutionen
dc.subjectSquirrelen
dc.subjectTelemetryen
dc.subjectWoodlanden
dc.subjectDispersalen
dc.subjectLeast cost path analysisen
dc.subjectConservationen
dc.titleUsing GPS telemetry to validate least-cost modeling of gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis) movement within a fragmented landscapeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Cumbriaen
dc.contributor.departmentForest Research UKen
dc.identifier.journalEcology and Evolutionen
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