Postural reorientation does not cause the locomotor after-effect following rotary locomotion

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/304847
Title:
Postural reorientation does not cause the locomotor after-effect following rotary locomotion
Authors:
Osler, Callum J.; Reynolds, Raymond Francis
Abstract:
After a period of stepping on a rotating platform, blindfolded subjects demonstrate a tendency to unconsciously turn when stepping in place, an after-effect known as podokinetic after-rotation (PKAR). Recent studies have also reported a change in postural orientation following the adaptive period and have suggested that this is causally related to PKAR. Here, we assess changes in trunk orientation following platform adaptation and determine their relationship to PKAR. Specifically, we determine whether a reorganized standing posture causes PKAR. Ten subjects stepped on a platform rotating at 60deg/s for 10 min, with a cadence of 100 steps/min. Following adaptation, a significant PKAR response was seen, with a mean yaw rotation velocity of 6.0 ± 2.2deg/s. In addition to this dynamic after-effect, there was a significant twist of the trunk with respect to the feet when standing still (6.9 ± 4.5deg; mean ± SD), confirming the presence of a postural reorientation after-effect. However, the magnitudes of the two after-effects did not correlate (r = 0.06, p = 0.87). Furthermore, in a second experiment, a prolonged passive twist of the trunk was used to induce postural reorientation. However, in this case, PKAR was not induced. These results demonstrate that PKAR is not an automatic consequence of reorganized standing posture.
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences
Citation:
Postural reorientation does not cause the locomotor after-effect following rotary locomotion 2012, 220 (3-4):231 Experimental Brain Research
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Experimental Brain Research
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/304847
DOI:
10.1007/s00221-012-3132-6
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-012-3132-6
Type:
Research Report
Language:
en
ISSN:
0014-4819; 1432-1106
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOsler, Callum J.en
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Raymond Francisen
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-31T18:57:20Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-31T18:57:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationPostural reorientation does not cause the locomotor after-effect following rotary locomotion 2012, 220 (3-4):231 Experimental Brain Researchen
dc.identifier.issn0014-4819-
dc.identifier.issn1432-1106-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00221-012-3132-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/304847-
dc.description.abstractAfter a period of stepping on a rotating platform, blindfolded subjects demonstrate a tendency to unconsciously turn when stepping in place, an after-effect known as podokinetic after-rotation (PKAR). Recent studies have also reported a change in postural orientation following the adaptive period and have suggested that this is causally related to PKAR. Here, we assess changes in trunk orientation following platform adaptation and determine their relationship to PKAR. Specifically, we determine whether a reorganized standing posture causes PKAR. Ten subjects stepped on a platform rotating at 60deg/s for 10 min, with a cadence of 100 steps/min. Following adaptation, a significant PKAR response was seen, with a mean yaw rotation velocity of 6.0 ± 2.2deg/s. In addition to this dynamic after-effect, there was a significant twist of the trunk with respect to the feet when standing still (6.9 ± 4.5deg; mean ± SD), confirming the presence of a postural reorientation after-effect. However, the magnitudes of the two after-effects did not correlate (r = 0.06, p = 0.87). Furthermore, in a second experiment, a prolonged passive twist of the trunk was used to induce postural reorientation. However, in this case, PKAR was not induced. These results demonstrate that PKAR is not an automatic consequence of reorganized standing posture.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-012-3132-6en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Experimental Brain Researchen
dc.subjectAdaptationen
dc.subjectAfter-effecten
dc.subjectBody orientationen
dc.subjectLocomotionen
dc.subjectPostureen
dc.titlePostural reorientation does not cause the locomotor after-effect following rotary locomotionen
dc.typeResearch Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Birmingham, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciencesen
dc.identifier.journalExperimental Brain Researchen
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.