Indirect effects of non-lethal predation on bivalve activity and sediment reworking

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/292687
Title:
Indirect effects of non-lethal predation on bivalve activity and sediment reworking
Authors:
Maire, O.; Merchant, J. N.; Bulling, Mark T.; Teal, L. R.; Grémare, A.; Duchêne, J. C.; Solan, Martin
Abstract:
Deposit-feeders are the dominant bioturbators of aquatic sediments, where they profoundly impact biogeochemical processes, but they are also vulnerable to both lethal and non-lethal predation by a large variety of predators. In this study, we performed a series of experiments to test the effects of predation avoidance on the feeding activity and sediment reworking intensity of the deposit-feeding bivalve Macoma balthica. Feeding activity at the sediment–water interface and sediment reworking intensity (vertical displacements of inert particle tracers) were monitored using image analysis techniques for treatments including and excluding the predatory shrimp, Crangon crangon. Detection of C. crangon by M. balthica resulted in an immediate retraction of the feeding siphon and a reduction in feeding activity. M. balthica also buried deeper into the sediment in the presence of C. crangon. This predator avoidance behaviour indirectly affected sediment reworking modes and rates, increasing the thickness of the bioturbated sediment layer as well as the non-local transport of sediment particles at depth. Conversely, feeding activity and sediment reworking processes remained unaffected when C. crangon was present, but isolated from the sediment, suggesting that predator perception in M. balthica is tactile (i.e. induced by direct encounter) rather than being chemosensory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that predatory avoidance behaviour by benthic infauna can significantly impact benthic bioturbation and the incorporation of organic matter into the benthic food web.
Citation:
Indirect effects of non-lethal predation on bivalve activity and sediment reworking 2010, 395 (1-2):30 Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Journal:
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Issue Date:
24-May-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/292687
DOI:
10.1016/j.jembe.2010.08.004
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022098110003217
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00220981
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaire, O.en
dc.contributor.authorMerchant, J. N.en
dc.contributor.authorBulling, Mark T.en
dc.contributor.authorTeal, L. R.en
dc.contributor.authorGrémare, A.en
dc.contributor.authorDuchêne, J. C.en
dc.contributor.authorSolan, Martinen
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-24T08:50:25Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-24T08:50:25Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-24-
dc.identifier.citationIndirect effects of non-lethal predation on bivalve activity and sediment reworking 2010, 395 (1-2):30 Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecologyen
dc.identifier.issn00220981-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jembe.2010.08.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/292687-
dc.description.abstractDeposit-feeders are the dominant bioturbators of aquatic sediments, where they profoundly impact biogeochemical processes, but they are also vulnerable to both lethal and non-lethal predation by a large variety of predators. In this study, we performed a series of experiments to test the effects of predation avoidance on the feeding activity and sediment reworking intensity of the deposit-feeding bivalve Macoma balthica. Feeding activity at the sediment–water interface and sediment reworking intensity (vertical displacements of inert particle tracers) were monitored using image analysis techniques for treatments including and excluding the predatory shrimp, Crangon crangon. Detection of C. crangon by M. balthica resulted in an immediate retraction of the feeding siphon and a reduction in feeding activity. M. balthica also buried deeper into the sediment in the presence of C. crangon. This predator avoidance behaviour indirectly affected sediment reworking modes and rates, increasing the thickness of the bioturbated sediment layer as well as the non-local transport of sediment particles at depth. Conversely, feeding activity and sediment reworking processes remained unaffected when C. crangon was present, but isolated from the sediment, suggesting that predator perception in M. balthica is tactile (i.e. induced by direct encounter) rather than being chemosensory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that predatory avoidance behaviour by benthic infauna can significantly impact benthic bioturbation and the incorporation of organic matter into the benthic food web.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022098110003217en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecologyen
dc.titleIndirect effects of non-lethal predation on bivalve activity and sediment reworking-
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecologyen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.