Somatic anxiety, physiological arousal and performance: differential effects upon high anaerobic, low memory demand tasks.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/266920
Title:
Somatic anxiety, physiological arousal and performance: differential effects upon high anaerobic, low memory demand tasks.
Authors:
Parfitt, C. Gaynor; Hardy, L.; Pates, John
Abstract:
Two studies are reported which used 16 basketball and volleyball players to investigate three hypotheses: (1) somatic anxiety is positively related to Sargent jump performance while cognitive anxiety is not; (2) physiological arousal is also positively related to Sargent jump performance; and (3) physiological arousal is more strongly related to Sargent jump performance than somatic anxiety. Multidimensional anxiety was measured on three occasions using the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory - 2 (CSAI-2; Martens, Burton, Vealey, Bump & Smith; 1982, 1990), physiological arousal was measured using heart rate, and Sargent jump performance was measured as height jumped. The results from both studies supported the three hypotheses, and indicate that for this particular task, increased somatic anxiety positively affects height jumped, cognitive anxiety does not affect performance, increased physiological arousal positively affects height jumped, and physiological arousal is more strongly related to performance than somatic anxiety. These results are discussed in terms of future research, as are the implications for the coach and practising sport psychologist.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Vol. 26 No. 2 pp. 196-213
Publisher:
International Society of Sports Psychology
Journal:
International Journal of Sports Psychology
Issue Date:
1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/266920
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0047-0767
Appears in Collections:
Department of Life Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorParfitt, C. Gaynoren
dc.contributor.authorHardy, L.en
dc.contributor.authorPates, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-24T16:05:38Zen
dc.date.available2013-01-24T16:05:38Zen
dc.date.issued1995en
dc.identifier.citationVol. 26 No. 2 pp. 196-213en
dc.identifier.issn0047-0767en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/266920en
dc.description.abstractTwo studies are reported which used 16 basketball and volleyball players to investigate three hypotheses: (1) somatic anxiety is positively related to Sargent jump performance while cognitive anxiety is not; (2) physiological arousal is also positively related to Sargent jump performance; and (3) physiological arousal is more strongly related to Sargent jump performance than somatic anxiety. Multidimensional anxiety was measured on three occasions using the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory - 2 (CSAI-2; Martens, Burton, Vealey, Bump & Smith; 1982, 1990), physiological arousal was measured using heart rate, and Sargent jump performance was measured as height jumped. The results from both studies supported the three hypotheses, and indicate that for this particular task, increased somatic anxiety positively affects height jumped, cognitive anxiety does not affect performance, increased physiological arousal positively affects height jumped, and physiological arousal is more strongly related to performance than somatic anxiety. These results are discussed in terms of future research, as are the implications for the coach and practising sport psychologist.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Society of Sports Psychologyen
dc.subjectPerformanceen
dc.subjectCompetitive anxietyen
dc.titleSomatic anxiety, physiological arousal and performance: differential effects upon high anaerobic, low memory demand tasks.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Psychologyen
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