Careers work in the blogosphere: can careers blogging widen access to career support?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/196696
Title:
Careers work in the blogosphere: can careers blogging widen access to career support?
Authors:
Hooley, Tristram
Abstract:
This article explores the phenomenon of careers blogging. It argues that the blogosphere is an important arena within which people are having career conversations. It then goes one to define a typology of careers blogs which distinguishes between personal career blogs, career support blogs and careers work blogs. The article focuses on a discussion of career support blogs which it seeks to contextualise as a form of career support or career guidance. The article demonstrates that the themes which career support blogs focus on are similar to those which career guidance practitioners focus on in other forms of delivery. Furthermore the business models that underpin career support blogs are also related to broader career support business models. However, it notes that the government pays’ and charity pays’ models are not represented in the sample of blogs identified here. It is possible that the lack of public or third sector funded career support blogs has an impact on the assumed audience for career support blogs. In general it appears that career support blogs are aimed at working adults although this may say more about how public sector funders have embraced blogging than about the inherent suitability of the mode for a wider range of clients. The article finishes by exploring how career support blogging fits into wider careers practice. An argument is made that the careers sector should engage further with career support blogging as it offers a practitioner-led, interactive and cost-effective form of service delivery.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Hooley, T. (2011) Careers work in the blogosphere: can careers blogging widen access to career support. In: Barham, L. and Irving, B.A. (eds) Constructing the Future: Diversity, Inclusion and Social Justice. Stourbridge: Institute of Career Guidance.
Journal:
Constructing the Future
Issue Date:
Nov-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/196696
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Educational Research and Innovation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHooley, Tristram-
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-09T15:31:09Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-09T15:31:09Z-
dc.date.issued2010-11-
dc.identifier.citationHooley, T. (2011) Careers work in the blogosphere: can careers blogging widen access to career support. In: Barham, L. and Irving, B.A. (eds) Constructing the Future: Diversity, Inclusion and Social Justice. Stourbridge: Institute of Career Guidance.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/196696-
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the phenomenon of careers blogging. It argues that the blogosphere is an important arena within which people are having career conversations. It then goes one to define a typology of careers blogs which distinguishes between personal career blogs, career support blogs and careers work blogs. The article focuses on a discussion of career support blogs which it seeks to contextualise as a form of career support or career guidance. The article demonstrates that the themes which career support blogs focus on are similar to those which career guidance practitioners focus on in other forms of delivery. Furthermore the business models that underpin career support blogs are also related to broader career support business models. However, it notes that the government pays’ and charity pays’ models are not represented in the sample of blogs identified here. It is possible that the lack of public or third sector funded career support blogs has an impact on the assumed audience for career support blogs. In general it appears that career support blogs are aimed at working adults although this may say more about how public sector funders have embraced blogging than about the inherent suitability of the mode for a wider range of clients. The article finishes by exploring how career support blogging fits into wider careers practice. An argument is made that the careers sector should engage further with career support blogging as it offers a practitioner-led, interactive and cost-effective form of service delivery.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleCareers work in the blogosphere: can careers blogging widen access to career support?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalConstructing the Futureen
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