‘Don’t Talk into my Talk’:oral narratives, cultural identity & popular performance in Colonial Uganda

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/142899
Title:
‘Don’t Talk into my Talk’:oral narratives, cultural identity & popular performance in Colonial Uganda
Authors:
Kasule, Samuel
Abstract:
Performance in colonial Uganda was dominated by dance and song, although individual technical mastery of dance, song, and instrumentation was a prerogative of the professional performers and court musicians who played at the royal courts, beer parties, and market places. There are limited written materials available on indigenous performances of the colonial period in Buganda. However, the existence of a corpus of archival Luganda musical recordings, going back to the 1930s, and oral narratives of aged people, gives us an insight into performance activities of this period. Old musical recordings help us to understand various forms of performance about which we know little, and contribute to aspects of performance that have shaped contemporary Ugandan theatre. The essay identifies popular performances a form existing before colonisation, how these were ‘documented’ and what has survived. It examines how the texts, impacted on by complex colonial and missionary systems reveal syncretised popular performance infrastructures. Finally, it explores the notion of the body as a “memory” reflecting on selected Ugandan indigenous aesthetics of performance.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Kasule, S. (2010) '‘Don’t Talk into my Talk’:oral narratives, cultural identity & popular performance in Colonial Uganda' in Banham, Martin, Gibbs, James and Osofisan, Femi (eds.) 'African Theatre 9: Histories 1850-1950, Boydell and Brewer, Martlesham, Suffolk, UK.
Publisher:
James Currey
Issue Date:
18-Nov-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/142899
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
The essay draws on available archival sources and conversations with performance practitioners to 'recover moments from the past'demonstrating the relationship between performers, society and the colonial masters.
ISBN:
978-1-84701-014-8
Appears in Collections:
Identity, Conflict & Representation Research Centre; Department of Humanities

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKasule, Samuelen
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-22T14:21:09Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-22T14:21:09Z-
dc.date.issued2010-11-18-
dc.identifier.citationKasule, S. (2010) '‘Don’t Talk into my Talk’:oral narratives, cultural identity & popular performance in Colonial Uganda' in Banham, Martin, Gibbs, James and Osofisan, Femi (eds.) 'African Theatre 9: Histories 1850-1950, Boydell and Brewer, Martlesham, Suffolk, UK.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-84701-014-8-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/142899-
dc.descriptionThe essay draws on available archival sources and conversations with performance practitioners to 'recover moments from the past'demonstrating the relationship between performers, society and the colonial masters.en
dc.description.abstractPerformance in colonial Uganda was dominated by dance and song, although individual technical mastery of dance, song, and instrumentation was a prerogative of the professional performers and court musicians who played at the royal courts, beer parties, and market places. There are limited written materials available on indigenous performances of the colonial period in Buganda. However, the existence of a corpus of archival Luganda musical recordings, going back to the 1930s, and oral narratives of aged people, gives us an insight into performance activities of this period. Old musical recordings help us to understand various forms of performance about which we know little, and contribute to aspects of performance that have shaped contemporary Ugandan theatre. The essay identifies popular performances a form existing before colonisation, how these were ‘documented’ and what has survived. It examines how the texts, impacted on by complex colonial and missionary systems reveal syncretised popular performance infrastructures. Finally, it explores the notion of the body as a “memory” reflecting on selected Ugandan indigenous aesthetics of performance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJames Curreyen
dc.subjectIndigenousen
dc.subjectPerformanceen
dc.subjectArchivesen
dc.subjectEmpireen
dc.title‘Don’t Talk into my Talk’:oral narratives, cultural identity & popular performance in Colonial Ugandaen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.