Welcome to UDORA, the University of Derby Online Research Archive.

UDORA is the institutional repository of research produced by staff at the University of Derby, and an archive of our completed doctoral theses.

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  • Renewable hydrogen anaerobic fermentation technology: problems and potentials

    Komolafe, Abiodun O.; Okere, Uchechukwu V.; University of Derby; Lancaster University; University of Southampton (Elsevier, 2019-08-21)
    Hydrogen technology is essential to the decarbonisation of global economies because it addresses the variability and storage limitation of renewable energy. Several research literatures on hydrogen technology have focused on energy systems with minimum attention given to other fossil fuel driven sectors such as chemical and material production. For effective decarbonisation, the application of hydrogen in global economies must extend beyond the use of energy systems. Renewable hydrogen anaerobic fermentation is a suitable technology for converting the hydrogen substrate into gaseous fuel and precursors for material and green chemical production. The technology leverages on the well-established anaerobic digestion (AD) technology and can be selectively operated for a specific product. Although there are some problems associated with renewable hydrogen anaerobic fermentation, studies show different technological advancements in mitigating these challenges. This review focuses on the technological breakthroughs and limitations associated with renewable hydrogen anaerobic fermentation and provides insights on other products that could be derived from it, especially for a circular economy and the emerging market of green chemicals, sustainable agriculture, and bio-based product development.
  • Multiple geophysical techniques for investigation and monitoring of sobradinho landslide, Brazil

    Hussain, Yawar; Cardenas-Soto, Martin; Martino, Salvatore; Moreira, Cesar; Borges, Welitom; Hamza, Omar; Prado, Renato; Uagoda, Rogerio; Rodríguez-Rebolledo, Juan; Silva, Rafeal; et al. (MDPI AG, 2019-11-26)
    Geophysical methods have a varying degree of potential for detailed characterization of landslides and their dynamics. In this study, the application of four well-established seismic-based geophysical techniques, namely Ambient Noise Interferometry (ANI), Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR), Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) and Nanoseismic Monitoring (NM), were considered to examine their suitability for landslide characterization and monitoring the effect of seasonal variation on slope mass. Furthermore, other methods such as Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and DC Resistivity through Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) were also used for comparison purpose. The advantages and limitations of these multiple techniques were exemplified by a case study conducted on Sobradinho landslide in Brazil. The study revealed that the geophysical characterization of the landslide using traditional techniques (i.e., GPR, ERT and MASW) were successful in (i) the differentiation between landslide debris and other Quaternary deposits, and (ii) the delineation of the landslide sliding surface. However, the innovative seismic based techniques, particularly ambient noise based (HVSR and ANI) and emitted seismic based (NM), were not very effective for the dynamic monitoring of landslide, which might be attributed to the short-time duration of the data acquisition campaigns. The HVSR was also unsuccessful in landslide site characterization i.e., identification of geometry and sliding surface. In particular, there was no clear evidence of the light seasonal variations, which could have been potentially detected from the physical parameters during the (short-time) ambient noise and microseismic acquisition campaigns. Nevertheless, the experienced integration of these geophysical techniques may provide a promising tool for future applications
  • Differential qualitative analysis: a pragmatic qualitative methodology to support personalised healthcare research in heterogenous samples

    Gonot-Schoupinsky, Freda; Garip, Gulcan; University of Derby (Nova Southeastern University, 2019-12-02)
    Differential qualitative analysis (DQA) was developed as a pragmatic qualitative health methodology for the exploration of individual differences, behaviours, and needs within heterogeneous samples. Existing qualitative methodologies tend to emphasise the identification of general principles, an approach that can lead to standardised treatment, care, and medicine. DQA emphasises the identification of individual variation, in order to inform personalised healthcare. DQA comprises an accessible three-stage approach: first individual profiles are explored and differentiated into research-relevant subgroups; then each subgroup is analysed, and findings identified; finally, the data is analysed in its entirety and overall and subgroup findings are presented. DQA was developed as a new qualitative approach to: (1) emphasise the identification of person and patient-centered findings; (2) facilitate the analysis of sample heterogeneity, including variation in responses and intervention outcomes; (3) provide a convenient, pragmatic, systematic, and transparent methodology; (4) bridge the qualitative-quantitative divide with a mutually accessible approach. DQA may be particularly relevant for mixed methods research, early-stage interventions, and research exploring personalised and patient-centred care, and integrative medicine.
  • WikiLiteracy: enhancing students' digital literacy with Wikipedia

    Ball, Caroline; University of Derby (CILIP Information Literacy Group, 2019-12-03)
    In January 2019 the University of Derby delivered its first module entirely dedicated to and structured around editing and writing articles for Wikipedia. The course focused on using Wikipedia as a means to improve students’ skills in writing for public consumption, in addition to enhancing their digital and collaborative skills. Students contributed to 118 articles across a range of topics, which were viewed over 11.2 million times, providing them with a public platform no university assignment could match, and introduced them to the challenges of interaction and engagement in a global editing community. Students’ confidence in their digital capabilities was assessed at the start and end of the module and showed a clear increase in confidence across all categories.
  • The longitudinal association between resting heart rate and psychopathic traits from a normative personality perspective

    Kavish, Nicholas; Bergstrøm, Henriette; Piquero, Alex R.; Farrington, David P.; Boutwell, Brian B.; Sam Houston University; University of Derby; The University of Texas at Dallas; University of Cambridge; University of Mississippi (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2019-10-23)
    A large body of research has accumulated investigating the possibility of an association between resting heart rate and psychopathic traits, with meta-analysis suggesting a modest, negative association. Some recent research suggests that prior findings of an association between heart rate and psychopathy may be influenced by inclusion of antisocial behavior in the assessment of psychopathic traits. The current study explores this possibility in a longitudinal sample of British males by comparing resting heart rate at age 18 to psychopathy assessed from a Five Factor Model perspective and from the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV) at age 48. Our psychopathic personality scale, created using the Big Five Inventory (BFI), was significantly correlated with the PCL:SV and was most related to the antisocial factor. In correlation analyses, resting heart rate at age 18 was not significantly related to BFI psychopathy, but was positively related to BFI Openness and Conscientiousness, and these associations held up after controlling for childhood SES, BMI at 18, and whether the participant smoked during the age 18 assessment. Additional analyses controlling for smoking status were conducted to address the biasing effect of smoking on heart rate during the age 18 assessment and a significant, albeit weak, negative association between resting heart rate and BFI psychopathy emerged. Future research should replicate these results using other normative personality approaches to assess psychopathic traits.

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