For the most recent Open Access research publications on Covid-19, please follow this link to DOAJ (the Directory of Open Access Journals) where you will be redirected to a number of free to access literature.

 

Access to Taylor and Francis microsite for free Covid-19 literature is available here. 

 

Welcome to UDORA, the University of Derby Online Research Archive.

UDORA is the institutional repository of research produced by staff at the University of Derby, and an archive of our completed doctoral theses.

If you are a member of staff ready to submit your research, please see our Quick Guide to Getting Started.

We welcome any feedback. Please contact UDORA@derby.ac.uk

 

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  • COVID-19 pandemic decision support system for a population defense strategy and vaccination effectiveness

    Varotsos, Costas A; Krapivin, Vladimir F; Xue, Yong; Soldatov, Vladimir; Voronova, Tatiana; National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Kotelnikov’s Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics, Fryazino Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vvedensky 1, Fryazino, Moscow Region 141190, Russian Federation; University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116, PR China; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2021-06-05)
    The year 2020 ended with a significant COVID-19 pandemic, which traumatized almost many countries where the lockdowns were restored, and numerous emotional social protests erupted. According to the World Health Organization, the global epidemiological situation in the first months of 2021 deteriorated. In this paper, the decision-making supporting system (DMSS) is proposed to be an epidemiological prediction tool. COVID-19 trends in several countries and regions, take into account the big data clouds for important geophysical and socio-ecological characteristics and the expected potentials of the medical service, including vaccination and restrictions on population migration both within the country and international traffic. These parameters for numerical simulations are estimated from officially delivered data that allows the verification of theoretical results. The numerical simulations of the transition and the results of COVID-19 are mainly based on the deterministic approach and the algorithm for processing statistical data based on the instability indicator. DMSS has been shown to help predict the effects of COVID-19 depending on the protection strategies against COVID-19 including vaccination. Numerical simulations have shown that DMSS provides results using accompanying information in the appropriate scenario.
  • The perception of biopsychosocial impacts of COVID-19 during lockdown restrictionsover time in the UK –a mixed methods study

    Grimwood, Samuel; Stuart, Kaz; Browning, Ruth; Winn-Reed, Thea; Bidmead, Elaine; University of Derby; University of Cumbria (Journal of Ideas in Health, 2021-07-20)
    The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted the health of individuals physically, mentally, and socially. This study aims to gain a deeper understanding of this impact across the pandemic from a biopsychosocial stance. A survey created by the research team was employed between November 2020 and February 2021 across social media, relevant organizations, and networks. The survey incorporated 5-time points across the different stages of the pandemic, covering biological, psychological, and social. There were 5 items for each survey (Very Positive affect to Very Negative affect), and analysis was undertaken using SPSS version 16. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric Friedman and Wilcoxon Tests, as well as correlations between the three domains, were implemented. This study included 164 participants (77.0% female and 35.0% male) across 24 out of 38 counties in the UK. The impact of COVID-19 on biological domain was significant across the five data points χ2(4) = 63.99, p < 0.001, psychological χ2(4) = 118.939, p <0.001 and socially χ2(4) = 186.43, p <0.001. Between the 5 data points, 4 out of 5 had a negative impact, however between the first stage of lockdown and the easing of restrictions, findings for biological (Z=-2.35, p <0.05), psychological (Z=-6.61, p < 0.001), and socially (Z = -8.61, p <0.001) were positive. Negative correlations between the three domains across the pandemic are apparent, but in later stages, the biological domain had a positive correlation r = 0.52, p < 0.001. The data shows a negative impact from the self-reported perception of wellbeing from a biopsychosocial stance over time, as well as perceiving the three domains to interact negatively. To address these biopsychosocial issues, the research implies a place-based integrated recovery effort is needed, addressing biological, psychological, and social issues simultaneously. Further research should investigate biopsychosocial health among a more generalizable population.
  • Why the initiative of free childcare failed to be an effective policy implementation of universal childcare in South Korea

    Lee, Sung-Hee; University of Derby (Taylors & Francis Online, 2021-07-22)
    Free childcare (‘moo-sang-bo-yuk’ in Korean) for all children aged 0-5 was implemented for the first time in South Korea in 2012, initially being aimed at establishing universal childcare in order to alleviate parents’ childcare burden. Despite the headlines grabbing policy reform, it still remains questionable whether the policy implementation has had any positive impact on parents’ childcare burden, in terms of the state taking on more responsibility in this regard. The paper is aimed at exploring how the meaning of universal childcare was communicated during the policy initiation process. In order to do so, interpretative policy analysis was utilised as a methodological approach, whilst relevant policy documents and in-depth interviews were used for data collection. Why the policy implementation could not succeed in bringing universal childcare to the fore is critically examined. I argue that these failings occurred because the policy implementation was placed on the agenda with a lack of commitment to increasing the number of public childcare centres, as well as disengagement from understanding the gender relations necessary for delivering universal childcare effectively.
  • Assisting you to advance with ethics in research: an introduction to ethical governance and application procedures

    Sivasubramaniam, Shivadas; Dlabolová, Henek Dlabolova; Kralikova, Veronika; Reza Khan, Zeenath; University of Derby; Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská, 1665, Brno, Czechia; University of Wollongong in Dubai, Dubai, UAE (Springer Nature, 2021-07-13)
    Ethics and ethical behaviour are the fundamental pillars of a civilised society. The focus on ethical behaviour is indispensable in certain fields such as medicine, finance, or law. In fact, ethics gets precedence with anything that would include, affect, transform, or influence upon individuals, communities or any living creatures. Many institutions within Europe have set up their own committees to focus on or approve activities that have ethical impact. In contrast, lesser-developed countries (worldwide) are trying to set up these committees to govern their academia and research. As the first European consortium established to assist academic integrity, European Network for Academic Integrity (ENAI), we felt the importance of guiding those institutions and communities that are trying to conduct research with ethical principles. We have established an ethical advisory working group within ENAI with the aim to promote ethics within curriculum, research and institutional policies. We are constantly researching available data on this subject and committed to help the academia to convey and conduct ethical behaviour. Upon preliminary review and discussion, the group found a disparity in understanding, practice and teaching approaches to ethical applications of research projects among peers. Therefore, this short paper preliminarily aims to critically review the available information on ethics, the history behind establishing ethical principles and its international guidelines to govern research. The paper is based on the workshop conducted in the 5th International conference Plagiarism across Europe and Beyond, in Mykolas Romeris University, Lithuania in 2019. During the workshop, we have detailed a) basic needs of an ethical committee within an institution; b) a typical ethical approval process (with examples from three different universities); and c) the ways to obtain informed consent with some examples. These are summarised in this paper with some example comparisons of ethical approval processes from different universities. We believe this paper will provide guidelines on preparing and training both researchers and research students in appropriately upholding ethical practices through ethical approval processes.
  • Study protocol: psychoeducation on attachment and narcissism as treatment of sex addiction

    Rhodes, Christine; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Concurrent Disorders Society, 2021-07-22)
    This study protocol reports a research design to examine the effects of a psycho-educational programme about attachment and narcissism on sex addiction. Previous research highlighted the great impacts of anxious attachment and narcissism on sex addiction. Unlike therapeutic approaches, where a therapist intervenes the client, psychoeducation can influence clients’ symptoms more subtly related to their less resistance. Further, considering a strong association between sex addiction and narcissism, such an approach may be more conducive. Given high shame associated with sex addictions and clients existing in many countries, the programme is implemented online using recorded videos, delivered four times weekly. Findings from this study can inform utility of this original intervention for sex addiction.

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