Welcome to UDORA, the University of Derby Online Research Archive.

UDORA is the institutional repository of research produced by staff at the University of Derby, and an archive of our completed doctoral theses.

If you are a member of staff ready to submit your research, please see our Quick Guide to Getting Started.

We welcome any feedback. Please contact UDORA@derby.ac.uk

 

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  • The diagnosis and management of pulmonary embolism

    Toplis, Emma; Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (Mark Allen Group, 2020-01-09)
    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a condition characterised by an obstruction of the pulmonary arterial system by one or more emboli. Advanced clinical practitioners are often faced with ruling out a diagnosis of PE in patients with non-specific symptoms such as dyspnoea and pleuritic chest pain, which can be fairly mild and therefore a diagnosis of PE easily missed. PEs can be a challenge to diagnose, especially in elderly people, since it can be difficult to differentiate their symptoms from other less serious illnesses. Widely used scoring tools are helpful to calculate a patient’s probability of having a PE. The Wells score is the most widely used pre-test clinical probability indicator of PE used in the UK, which scores the patient’s probability of having a PE based on their risk factors. The D-dimer test is a relatively simple investigation to rule out venous thromboembolism (VTE) but can be raised for various reasons other than PE. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is regarded as the gold standard imaging modality for investigation of acute PE but ventilation-perfusion (VQ) scans be used as an alternative imaging technique for diagnosing PE in those where CTPA is contraindicated. Thrombolysis is underused in clinical practice due to the fear of adverse bleeding events. Patients without a massive or sub-massive PE are treated with anticoagulant therapy, usually commencing with subcutaneous lowmolecular- weight heparin and switching over to a direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC). There has been a shift away from treatment with warfarin for the prevention and treatment of VTE over the past decade.
  • The sister arts: Textile crafts between paint, print, and practice

    Gowrley, Freya; University of Derby (Wiley, 2020)
    This article explores intersections between portraiture, printed genre images, and conduct literature in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain, focusing on representations of needlework between these cultural forms. In extant scholarship, needlework has been characterised as an important site of debate, a discursive locus wherein the qualities of appropriate femininity were sketched out and redefined. This article centres on the very mechanisms by which this discourse operated, arguing that visual and literary images of needlework were central to the creation of a grammar of respectable femininity, a symbolic language that simultaneously advocated maternal instruction, domestic industry, and marital eligibility.
  • The predictive scenographer: Performance design as predictive affordance-o-graphy

    Penna, Xristina; University of Leeds (27/11/2018)
    We are finding parts of ourselves, playing, playing with the light, unexpected events […] wood, fabric, cameras, sound equipment, and a bit of alcohol. Shades of red, grey, it is pretty dark, you cannot see much. It provokes you in terms of fiction. (Participant S3, practice-research project Work Space III, October 2015). In hybrid and participatory performance environments, the audience’s position constantly shifts and is not contained within a viewing area, like in traditional forms of theatre, raising questions for the performance maker such as: How do I design the distribution of the experience of the audience? How do I contextualise this distribution? How do I frame this experience; and the feelings generated by a distributed design? In this paper, I will reflect through specific performance practice on how the free-energy principle (Friston 2011) and PP (Clark 2013) can be useful for a performance designer (scenographer) as a method for performance making but also as a way of contextualising what participatory performances do and how they do it. The audience–participants’ predictive brains are understood to get a grip on multiple fields of affordances (both material, cultural, etc.) simultaneously, and these become interweaved in the circular causal weave between embodied brain and world. The plurality of possible fields of interrelations the audience–participants make in relation to the design stretch across interoceptive, proprioceptive, and exteroceptive information, providing “a rich new entry point for accounts of experience, emotion, and affect: accounts that do not compartmentalize cognition and emotion, but reveal them as (at most) distinctive threads in a single inferential weave” (Clark 2015: 296). WS III’s scenography could be described as an embodied, and ecological playful. prediction algorithm that had the audience–participants as anticipating errors predicating the next moves in order to maintain the organisation of the performance system..
  • To you, to me: Generation non-eocentric habits of embodied, embedded, enactive and extended spectating.

    Penna, Xristina; University of Leeds (19/06/2019)
    Practice-led presentation involving the participation of the delegates.
  • Work space II: attempts on Margarita

    Penna, Xristina; Eyes, Ben; Graham, Katherine; Carlsberg, Jennifer; Steggals, Lucy; Bradbury, Olivia; Kapsali, Maria; Turner, Alaena; Collins, Esther; University of Leeds (Stage@Leeds, 26/02/2015)
    Margarita is a pile of constantly changing drafts ready to be revised, retold, forgotten, erased… Can we keep Margarita going? This performance installation asks for the audiences’ participation in constructing a collective consciousness: Margarita. It is created as part of Xristina’s Practice Research on performance design, and cognition at PCI using recordings, live performance and ‘scenographic contraptions’. The project contributed to the collection of qualitative data (images, post-show interviews, and participant questionnaires) for the analysis of the interaction between audience-participants, and the scenographic environment. Xristina is testing here a methodological tool brought into her research from her performance design and practice background: the contraption. She situates the metaphorical notion of consciousness as ‘multiple drafts’ following Dennett, who, when trying to explain how consciousness works ‘avoids supposing that there must be a single narrative (the “final” or “published” draft, you might say)’ (Dennett 1991: 113), but rather that there are multiple drafts or ‘narrative fragments’ at various stages of editing in various places in the brain (Dennett 1991: 113). This metaphor is used as a critical design-practice tool (contraption) for generating dynamic and reflective exchange between the audience-participants, the artists-collaborators, the environment and the practitioner-researcher. The audiences’ engagement and experience with this environment is further analysed using embodiment, the socially collaborative and ecological nature of human cognition.The composition of the work consists of pre-recorded voices of friends/colleagues/acquaintances of the practitioner-researcher and of live-streamed voices of random passers-by, answering the same set of questions regarding themselves or a female person they know well. The show is divided in 11 chapters, which correspond to the above questions and form a sonic collage, heard through a surround sound system controlled live by the sound designer, and the lighting designer. Container-structures invite the audience to literally immerse in them and listen to the more intimate audio recordings (i.e. the secret pleasures of Margarita). A folk English song talking about an apple and a head is performed live every 15 minutes, while multiple transcripts of the recordings are printed out ad hoc and placed on the floor for the audience to read; a button box waits to be explored and the lighting designer intervenes live corresponding with different lighting atmospheres. The audience-participants visiting the installation are invited to freely explore this sonic, performed and material environment and piece together the experience of Margarita.

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