Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/623283
Title:
Nurses' recognition of domestic violence and abuse.
Authors:
Byrom, Beth; Collier, Elizabeth; Rogers, Michaela
Abstract:
Most literature and discourse on domestic violence and abuse (DVA) focuses on women but there is a need to be cognisant of the broader population experiencing DVA and the wide-ranging impacts that can affect anybody whatever their identity or background. Mental Health nurses are in a good position to help people who experience DVA but they need to be able to recognise it first. This paper reports on a review which aims to address the question: How can mental health nurses recognise domestic violence and abuse (DVA)?. The databases CINAHL, Medline, PsychINFO and ASSIA were searched using key terms related to DVA and nursing and recognition. The term ‘nursing’ was used as the ‘mental health nursing’ search term found only two papers. Limits for the search were English language research only papers from 2002-2017. Fifteen papers were included in the review. Most of the located research focused on health care practitioners in multidisciplinary teams with nursing literature focused on adult health nurses rather than mental health nursing. The findings are presented in the categories: education, training and organisational support, and, screening, inquiry and the therapeutic relationship, with an additional category (given the original aim of the review) ‘mental health settings’. The experience of DVA has significant consequences for mental health yet we found only two research papers focused on mental health settings. We therefore discuss and extrapolate from reviewed literature the implications for practice in the context of mental health nursing.
Affiliation:
Salford University
Citation:
Byrom, B., Collier, E., and Rogers, M. (2017) ‘Nurses' recognition of domestic violence and abuse’, 2017, British Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 6 (6):286. Doi: 10.12968/bjmh.2017.6.6.286
Publisher:
Mark Allen Healthcare
Journal:
British Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Issue Date:
28-Dec-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/623283
DOI:
10.12968/bjmh.2017.6.6.286
Additional Links:
http://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/bjmh.2017.6.6.286
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2049-5919; 2052-496X
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
School of Nursing and Professional Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorByrom, Bethen
dc.contributor.authorCollier, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Michaelaen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-11T14:24:41Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-11T14:24:41Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-28-
dc.identifier.citationByrom, B., Collier, E., and Rogers, M. (2017) ‘Nurses' recognition of domestic violence and abuse’, 2017, British Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 6 (6):286. Doi: 10.12968/bjmh.2017.6.6.286en
dc.identifier.issn2049-5919-
dc.identifier.issn2052-496X-
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/bjmh.2017.6.6.286-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623283-
dc.description.abstractMost literature and discourse on domestic violence and abuse (DVA) focuses on women but there is a need to be cognisant of the broader population experiencing DVA and the wide-ranging impacts that can affect anybody whatever their identity or background. Mental Health nurses are in a good position to help people who experience DVA but they need to be able to recognise it first. This paper reports on a review which aims to address the question: How can mental health nurses recognise domestic violence and abuse (DVA)?. The databases CINAHL, Medline, PsychINFO and ASSIA were searched using key terms related to DVA and nursing and recognition. The term ‘nursing’ was used as the ‘mental health nursing’ search term found only two papers. Limits for the search were English language research only papers from 2002-2017. Fifteen papers were included in the review. Most of the located research focused on health care practitioners in multidisciplinary teams with nursing literature focused on adult health nurses rather than mental health nursing. The findings are presented in the categories: education, training and organisational support, and, screening, inquiry and the therapeutic relationship, with an additional category (given the original aim of the review) ‘mental health settings’. The experience of DVA has significant consequences for mental health yet we found only two research papers focused on mental health settings. We therefore discuss and extrapolate from reviewed literature the implications for practice in the context of mental health nursing.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Healthcareen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/bjmh.2017.6.6.286en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Journal of Mental Health Nursingen
dc.rights“This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in Journal of Mental Health Nursing, copyright © MA Healthcare, after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/journal/bjmh."-
dc.subjectDomestic violence and abuseen
dc.subjectNurses recognitionen
dc.titleNurses' recognition of domestic violence and abuse.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSalford Universityen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Mental Health Nursingen
dc.contributor.institutionStaff nurse, North Manchester General Hospital-
dc.contributor.institutionLecturer in mental health, University of Salford-
dc.contributor.institutionLecturer in social work, University of Salford-
dc.dateAccepted2018-11-02-
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