Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622984
Title:
Web-building spiders attract prey by storing decaying matter.
Authors:
Bjorkman-Chiswell, Bojun T.; Kulinski, Melissa M.; Muscat, Robert L.; Nguyen, Kim A.; Norton, Briony, A. ( 0000-0001-9354-5904 ) ; Symonds, Matthew R. E.; Westhorpe, Gina E.; Elgar, Mark A.
Abstract:
The orb-weaving spider Nephila edulis incorporates into its web a band of decaying animal and plant matter. While earlier studies demonstrate that larger spiders utilise these debris bands as caches of food, the presence of plant matter suggests additional functions. When organic and plastic items were placed in the webs of N. edulis, some of the former but none of the latter were incorporated into the debris band. Using an Y-maze olfactometer, we show that sheep blowflies Lucilia cuprina are attracted to recently collected debris bands, but that this attraction does not persist over time. These data reveal an entirely novel foraging strategy, in which a sit-and-wait predator attracts insect prey by utilising the odours of decaying organic material. The spider’s habit of replenishing the debris band may be necessary to maintain its efficacy for attracting prey.
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne; James Cook University
Citation:
Bjorkman-Chiswell, B. T. et al (2004) 'Web-building spiders attract prey by storing decaying matter', Naturwissenschaften,91 (5):245.
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Naturwissenschaften
Issue Date:
1-May-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622984
DOI:
10.1007/s00114-004-0524-x
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00114-004-0524-x
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
00281042
EISSN:
14321904
Sponsors:
the ARC (grant DP0209680)
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Sustainability Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBjorkman-Chiswell, Bojun T.en
dc.contributor.authorKulinski, Melissa M.en
dc.contributor.authorMuscat, Robert L.en
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Kim A.en
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Briony, A.en
dc.contributor.authorSymonds, Matthew R. E.en
dc.contributor.authorWesthorpe, Gina E.en
dc.contributor.authorElgar, Mark A.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-14T09:19:09Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-14T09:19:09Z-
dc.date.issued2004-05-01-
dc.identifier.citationBjorkman-Chiswell, B. T. et al (2004) 'Web-building spiders attract prey by storing decaying matter', Naturwissenschaften,91 (5):245.en
dc.identifier.issn00281042-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00114-004-0524-x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622984-
dc.description.abstractThe orb-weaving spider Nephila edulis incorporates into its web a band of decaying animal and plant matter. While earlier studies demonstrate that larger spiders utilise these debris bands as caches of food, the presence of plant matter suggests additional functions. When organic and plastic items were placed in the webs of N. edulis, some of the former but none of the latter were incorporated into the debris band. Using an Y-maze olfactometer, we show that sheep blowflies Lucilia cuprina are attracted to recently collected debris bands, but that this attraction does not persist over time. These data reveal an entirely novel foraging strategy, in which a sit-and-wait predator attracts insect prey by utilising the odours of decaying organic material. The spider’s habit of replenishing the debris band may be necessary to maintain its efficacy for attracting prey.en
dc.description.sponsorshipthe ARC (grant DP0209680)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00114-004-0524-xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Naturwissenschaftenen
dc.subjectOdouren
dc.subjectFood cacheen
dc.subjectSpidersen
dc.subjectPreyen
dc.subjectInsectsen
dc.titleWeb-building spiders attract prey by storing decaying matter.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn14321904-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Melbourneen
dc.contributor.departmentJames Cook Universityen
dc.identifier.journalNaturwissenschaftenen
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