Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622983
Title:
A global synthesis of plant extinction rates in urban areas.
Authors:
Hahs, Amy K.; McDonnell, Mark J.; McCarthy, Michael A.; Vesk, Peter A.; Corlett, Richard T.; Norton, Briony, A. ( 0000-0001-9354-5904 ) ; Clemants, Steven E.; Duncan, Richard P.; Thompson, Ken; Schwartz, Mark W.; Williams, Nicholas S. G.
Abstract:
Plant extinctions from urban areas are a growing threat to biodiversity worldwide. To minimize this threat, it is critical to understand what factors are influencing plant extinction rates. We compiled plant extinction rate data for 22 cities around the world. Two‐thirds of the variation in plant extinction rates was explained by a combination of the city’s historical development and the current proportion of native vegetation, with the former explaining the greatest variability. As a single variable, the amount of native vegetation remaining also influenced extinction rates, particularly in cities > 200 years old. Our study demonstrates that the legacies of landscape transformations by agrarian and urban development last for hundreds of years, and modern cities potentially carry a large extinction debt. This finding highlights the importance of preserving native vegetation in urban areas and the need for mitigation to minimize potential plant extinctions in the future.
Affiliation:
Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne; University of Melbourne; National University of Singapore; Brooklyn Botanic Garden; Lincoln University; University of Sheffield; University of California
Citation:
Hahs, A. K. et al (2009) 'A global synthesis of plant extinction rates in urban areas', Ecology Letters,12 (11):1165.
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Ecology Letters
Issue Date:
13-Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622983
DOI:
10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01372.x
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01372.x
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1461023X; 14610248
Sponsors:
This working group was funded by the ARC‐NZ Research Network for Vegetation Function. Additional funding and support were also provided by The Baker Foundation, the Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, and The School of Botany and Melbourne School of Land and Environment at The University of Melbourne.
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Sustainability Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHahs, Amy K.en
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Mark J.en
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Michael A.en
dc.contributor.authorVesk, Peter A.en
dc.contributor.authorCorlett, Richard T.en
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Briony, A.en
dc.contributor.authorClemants, Steven E.en
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Richard P.en
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Kenen
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Mark W.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Nicholas S. G.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-14T09:16:34Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-14T09:16:34Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-13-
dc.identifier.citationHahs, A. K. et al (2009) 'A global synthesis of plant extinction rates in urban areas', Ecology Letters,12 (11):1165.en
dc.identifier.issn1461023X-
dc.identifier.issn14610248-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01372.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622983-
dc.description.abstractPlant extinctions from urban areas are a growing threat to biodiversity worldwide. To minimize this threat, it is critical to understand what factors are influencing plant extinction rates. We compiled plant extinction rate data for 22 cities around the world. Two‐thirds of the variation in plant extinction rates was explained by a combination of the city’s historical development and the current proportion of native vegetation, with the former explaining the greatest variability. As a single variable, the amount of native vegetation remaining also influenced extinction rates, particularly in cities > 200 years old. Our study demonstrates that the legacies of landscape transformations by agrarian and urban development last for hundreds of years, and modern cities potentially carry a large extinction debt. This finding highlights the importance of preserving native vegetation in urban areas and the need for mitigation to minimize potential plant extinctions in the future.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis working group was funded by the ARC‐NZ Research Network for Vegetation Function. Additional funding and support were also provided by The Baker Foundation, the Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, and The School of Botany and Melbourne School of Land and Environment at The University of Melbourne.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01372.xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Ecology Lettersen
dc.subjectConservation biologyen
dc.subjectExtinction debten
dc.subjectGlobal changeen
dc.subjectLand‐cover changeen
dc.subjectLandscape ecologyen
dc.subjectHistorical dataen
dc.subjectNative vegetationen
dc.subjectNovel ecosystemsen
dc.subjectRestoration ecologyen
dc.subjectSpecies persistenceen
dc.titleA global synthesis of plant extinction rates in urban areas.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal Botanic Gardens Melbourneen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Melbourneen
dc.contributor.departmentNational University of Singaporeen
dc.contributor.departmentBrooklyn Botanic Gardenen
dc.contributor.departmentLincoln Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffielden
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Californiaen
dc.identifier.journalEcology Lettersen
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