Planning for cooler cities: A framework to prioritise green infrastructure to mitigate high temperatures in urban landscapes.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622982
Title:
Planning for cooler cities: A framework to prioritise green infrastructure to mitigate high temperatures in urban landscapes.
Authors:
Norton, Briony, A. ( 0000-0001-9354-5904 ) ; Coutts, Andrew M.; Livesley, Stephen J.; Harris, Richard J.; Hunter, Annie M.; Williams, Nicholas S. G.
Abstract:
Warming associated with urban development will be exacerbated in future years by temperature increases due to climate change. The strategic implementation of urban green infrastructure (UGI) e.g. street trees, parks, green roofs and facades can help achieve temperature reductions in urban areas while delivering diverse additional benefits such as pollution reduction and biodiversity habitat. Although the greatest thermal benefits of UGI are achieved in climates with hot, dry summers, there is comparatively little information available for land managers to determine an appropriate strategy for UGI implementation under these climatic conditions. We present a framework for prioritisation and selection of UGI for cooling. The framework is supported by a review of the scientific literature examining the relationships between urban geometry, UGI and temperature mitigation which we used to develop guidelines for UGI implementation that maximises urban surface temperature cooling. We focus particularly on quantifying the cooling benefits of four types of UGI: green open spaces (primarily public parks), shade trees, green roofs, and vertical greening systems (green walls and facades) and demonstrate how the framework can be applied using a case study from Melbourne, Australia.
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne; Monash University
Citation:
Norton, B. A. et al (2015) 'Planning for cooler cities: A framework to prioritise green infrastructure to mitigate high temperatures in urban landscapes', Landscape and Urban Planning, 134:127 .
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Landscape and Urban Planning
Issue Date:
11-Nov-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622982
DOI:
10.1016/j.landurbplan.2014.10.018
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0169204614002503
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
01692046
Sponsors:
This paper arose from a project funded by the Victorian Centre for Climate Change Adaptation Research (VCCCAR). The City of Port Phillip made available the thermal imagery data and supporting GIS layers.
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Sustainability Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Briony, A.en
dc.contributor.authorCoutts, Andrew M.en
dc.contributor.authorLivesley, Stephen J.en
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Richard J.en
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Annie M.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Nicholas S. G.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-14T09:11:56Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-14T09:11:56Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-11-
dc.identifier.citationNorton, B. A. et al (2015) 'Planning for cooler cities: A framework to prioritise green infrastructure to mitigate high temperatures in urban landscapes', Landscape and Urban Planning, 134:127 .en
dc.identifier.issn01692046-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.landurbplan.2014.10.018-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622982-
dc.description.abstractWarming associated with urban development will be exacerbated in future years by temperature increases due to climate change. The strategic implementation of urban green infrastructure (UGI) e.g. street trees, parks, green roofs and facades can help achieve temperature reductions in urban areas while delivering diverse additional benefits such as pollution reduction and biodiversity habitat. Although the greatest thermal benefits of UGI are achieved in climates with hot, dry summers, there is comparatively little information available for land managers to determine an appropriate strategy for UGI implementation under these climatic conditions. We present a framework for prioritisation and selection of UGI for cooling. The framework is supported by a review of the scientific literature examining the relationships between urban geometry, UGI and temperature mitigation which we used to develop guidelines for UGI implementation that maximises urban surface temperature cooling. We focus particularly on quantifying the cooling benefits of four types of UGI: green open spaces (primarily public parks), shade trees, green roofs, and vertical greening systems (green walls and facades) and demonstrate how the framework can be applied using a case study from Melbourne, Australia.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis paper arose from a project funded by the Victorian Centre for Climate Change Adaptation Research (VCCCAR). The City of Port Phillip made available the thermal imagery data and supporting GIS layers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0169204614002503en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Landscape and Urban Planningen
dc.subjectUrban greeningen
dc.subjectClimate change adaptationen
dc.subjectHeat waveen
dc.subjectPublic healthen
dc.subjectUrban planningen
dc.subjectGreen roofen
dc.titlePlanning for cooler cities: A framework to prioritise green infrastructure to mitigate high temperatures in urban landscapes.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Melbourneen
dc.contributor.departmentMonash Universityen
dc.identifier.journalLandscape and Urban Planningen
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