Telephone-supported computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy: REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622277
Title:
Telephone-supported computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy: REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial.
Authors:
Gilbody, Simon; Brabyn, Sally; Lovell, Karina; Kessler, David; Devlin, Thomas; Smith, Lucy; Araya, Ricardo; Barkham, Michael; Bower, Peter; Cooper, Cindy; Knowles, Sarah; Littlewood, Elizabeth; Richards, David A.; Tallon, Debbie; White, David; Worthy, Gillian
Abstract:
Background Computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy (cCBT) for depression has the potential to be efficient therapy but engagement is poor in primary care trials. Aims We tested the benefits of adding telephone support to cCBT. Method We compared telephone-facilitated cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 187) to minimally supported cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 182) in a pragmatic randomised trial (trial registration: ISRCTN55310481). Outcomes were depression severity (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD)-7) and somatoform complaints (PHQ-15) at 4 and 12 months. Results Use of cCBT increased by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 with telephone facilitation. At 4 months PHQ-9 scores were 1.9 points lower (95% CI 0.5–3.3) for telephone-supported cCBT. At 12 months, the results were no longer statistically significant (0.9 PHQ-9 points, 95% CI –0.5 to 2.3). There was improvement in anxiety scores and for somatic complaints. Conclusions Telephone facilitation of cCBT improves engagement and expedites depression improvement. The effect was small to moderate and comparable with other low-intensity psychological interventions.
Affiliation:
University of York; University of Manchester; University of Bristol; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; University of Sheffield; University of Exeter
Citation:
Gilbody, S. et al (2018) 'Telephone-supported computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy: REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial', British Journal of Psychiatry, 210 (05):362.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Journal:
British Journal of Psychiatry
Issue Date:
2-Jan-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622277
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.116.192435
Additional Links:
https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007125000281439/type/journal_article
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
00071250
EISSN:
14721465
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Department of Humanities

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGilbody, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorBrabyn, Sallyen
dc.contributor.authorLovell, Karinaen
dc.contributor.authorKessler, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorDevlin, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Lucyen
dc.contributor.authorAraya, Ricardoen
dc.contributor.authorBarkham, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorBower, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Cindyen
dc.contributor.authorKnowles, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorLittlewood, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorRichards, David A.en
dc.contributor.authorTallon, Debbieen
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorWorthy, Gillianen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-13T09:19:53Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-13T09:19:53Z-
dc.date.issued2018-01-02-
dc.identifier.citationGilbody, S. et al (2018) 'Telephone-supported computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy: REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial', British Journal of Psychiatry, 210 (05):362.en
dc.identifier.issn00071250-
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.bp.116.192435-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622277-
dc.description.abstractBackground Computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy (cCBT) for depression has the potential to be efficient therapy but engagement is poor in primary care trials. Aims We tested the benefits of adding telephone support to cCBT. Method We compared telephone-facilitated cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 187) to minimally supported cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 182) in a pragmatic randomised trial (trial registration: ISRCTN55310481). Outcomes were depression severity (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD)-7) and somatoform complaints (PHQ-15) at 4 and 12 months. Results Use of cCBT increased by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 with telephone facilitation. At 4 months PHQ-9 scores were 1.9 points lower (95% CI 0.5–3.3) for telephone-supported cCBT. At 12 months, the results were no longer statistically significant (0.9 PHQ-9 points, 95% CI –0.5 to 2.3). There was improvement in anxiety scores and for somatic complaints. Conclusions Telephone facilitation of cCBT improves engagement and expedites depression improvement. The effect was small to moderate and comparable with other low-intensity psychological interventions.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007125000281439/type/journal_articleen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Journal of Psychiatryen
dc.subjectCognitive behaviour therapyen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.titleTelephone-supported computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy: REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn14721465-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Yorken
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Manchesteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bristolen
dc.contributor.departmentLondon School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicineen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffielden
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Exeteren
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Psychiatryen
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