Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622054
Title:
Genetic haemochromatosis: diagnosing and treating hereditary iron overload.
Authors:
Mortimore, Gerri ( 0000-0001-6890-4346 )
Abstract:
Genetic haemochromatosis (GH) is the most common inherited genetic disorder in caucasians, affecting approximately 1 in every 200–250 people. It leads to an increased absorption and deposition of iron, and if it is untreated it can cause systemic iron overload in some patients. This iron overload can cause inflammation and tissue damage to multiple organs, with the potential to lead to heart disease, diabetes and cirrhosis of the liver. Despite being a common condition, it is thought to be under diagnosed. However, it is known that some patients with a diagnosis of GH will present with cirrhosis at a young age, while others are virtually asymptomatic. Symptoms can be generalised, and diagnosis is made on blood tests. Treatment for GH requires the removal of blood, known as venesection. Approximately 400–500mls are removed at a time, and this procedure can be undertaken weekly until ferritin levels are brought down to 50 µg/l or below.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Mortimore, G. (2017) 'Genetic haemochromatosis: diagnosing and treating hereditary iron overload', Gastrointestinal Nursing, 15 (Sup10):S16
Publisher:
Mark Allen Group
Journal:
Gastrointestinal Nursing
Issue Date:
Dec-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622054
DOI:
10.12968/gasn.2017.15.Sup10.S16
Additional Links:
http://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/gasn.2017.15.Sup10.S16
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
14795248; 20522835
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
School of Nursing and Professional Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMortimore, Gerrien
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-12T15:46:46Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-12T15:46:46Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-
dc.identifier.citationMortimore, G. (2017) 'Genetic haemochromatosis: diagnosing and treating hereditary iron overload', Gastrointestinal Nursing, 15 (Sup10):S16en
dc.identifier.issn14795248-
dc.identifier.issn20522835-
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/gasn.2017.15.Sup10.S16-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622054-
dc.description.abstractGenetic haemochromatosis (GH) is the most common inherited genetic disorder in caucasians, affecting approximately 1 in every 200–250 people. It leads to an increased absorption and deposition of iron, and if it is untreated it can cause systemic iron overload in some patients. This iron overload can cause inflammation and tissue damage to multiple organs, with the potential to lead to heart disease, diabetes and cirrhosis of the liver. Despite being a common condition, it is thought to be under diagnosed. However, it is known that some patients with a diagnosis of GH will present with cirrhosis at a young age, while others are virtually asymptomatic. Symptoms can be generalised, and diagnosis is made on blood tests. Treatment for GH requires the removal of blood, known as venesection. Approximately 400–500mls are removed at a time, and this procedure can be undertaken weekly until ferritin levels are brought down to 50 µg/l or below.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/gasn.2017.15.Sup10.S16en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Gastrointestinal Nursingen
dc.subjectHereditary conditionsen
dc.subjectHuman hemochromatosis protein (HFE)en
dc.subjectIron overloaden
dc.subjectCirrhoticsen
dc.subjectLiver diseaseen
dc.subjectVenesectionen
dc.titleGenetic haemochromatosis: diagnosing and treating hereditary iron overload.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalGastrointestinal Nursingen
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