Embodying compassion: A virtual reality paradigm for overcoming excessive self-criticism

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621746
Title:
Embodying compassion: A virtual reality paradigm for overcoming excessive self-criticism
Authors:
Falconer, Caroline J.; Slater, Mel; Rovira, Aitor; King, John A.; Gilbert, Paul ( 0000-0001-8431-9892 ) ; Antley, Angus; Brewin, Chris R.
Abstract:
Virtual reality has been successfully used to study and treat psychological disorders such as phobias and posttraumatic stress disorder but has rarely been applied to clinically-relevant emotions other than fear and anxiety. Self-criticism is a ubiquitous feature of psychopathology and can be treated by increasing levels of self-compassion. We exploited the known effects of identification with a virtual body to arrange for healthy female volunteers high in self-criticism to experience self-compassion from an embodied first-person perspective within immersive virtual reality. Whereas observation and practice of compassionate responses reduced self-criticism, the additional experience of embodiment also increased self-compassion and feelings of being safe. The results suggest potential new uses for immersive virtual reality in a range of clinical conditions.
Affiliation:
University College London; University of Barcelona; University of Derby
Citation:
Falconer, C. J. et al (2014) 'Embodying Compassion: A Virtual Reality Paradigm for Overcoming Excessive Self-Criticism', PLoS ONE, 9 (11):e111933
Publisher:
PLOS
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Issue Date:
12-Nov-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621746
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0111933
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0111933
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
19326203
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFalconer, Caroline J.en
dc.contributor.authorSlater, Melen
dc.contributor.authorRovira, Aitoren
dc.contributor.authorKing, John A.en
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorAntley, Angusen
dc.contributor.authorBrewin, Chris R.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-14T15:50:15Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-14T15:50:15Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-12-
dc.identifier.citationFalconer, C. J. et al (2014) 'Embodying Compassion: A Virtual Reality Paradigm for Overcoming Excessive Self-Criticism', PLoS ONE, 9 (11):e111933en
dc.identifier.issn19326203-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0111933-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621746-
dc.description.abstractVirtual reality has been successfully used to study and treat psychological disorders such as phobias and posttraumatic stress disorder but has rarely been applied to clinically-relevant emotions other than fear and anxiety. Self-criticism is a ubiquitous feature of psychopathology and can be treated by increasing levels of self-compassion. We exploited the known effects of identification with a virtual body to arrange for healthy female volunteers high in self-criticism to experience self-compassion from an embodied first-person perspective within immersive virtual reality. Whereas observation and practice of compassionate responses reduced self-criticism, the additional experience of embodiment also increased self-compassion and feelings of being safe. The results suggest potential new uses for immersive virtual reality in a range of clinical conditions.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLOSen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0111933en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS ONEen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectVirtual Realityen
dc.subjectPost traumatic stressen
dc.subjectPhobiaen
dc.subjectFearen
dc.titleEmbodying compassion: A virtual reality paradigm for overcoming excessive self-criticismen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Londonen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Barcelonaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.