Grooming relationships between breeding females and adult group members in cooperatively breeding moustached tamarins (Saguinus mystax)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/596319
Title:
Grooming relationships between breeding females and adult group members in cooperatively breeding moustached tamarins (Saguinus mystax)
Authors:
Löttker, Petra; Huck, Maren ( 0000-0002-7740-3903 ) ; Zinner, Dietmar P.; Heymann, Eckhard W.
Abstract:
Grooming is the most common form of affiliative behavior in primates that apart from hygienic and hedonistic benefits offers important social benefits for the performing individuals. This study examined grooming behavior in a cooperatively breeding primate species, characterized by single female breeding per group, polyandrous matings, dizygotic twinning, delayed offspring dispersal, and intensive helping behavior. In this system, breeding females profit from the presence of helpers but also helpers profit from staying in a group and assisting in infant care due to the accumulation of direct and indirect fitness benefits. We examined grooming relationships of breeding females with three classes of partners (breeding males, potentially breeding males, (sub)adult non-breeding offspring) during three reproductive phases (post-partum ovarian inactivity, ovarian activity, pregnancy) in two groups of wild moustached tamarins (Saguinus mystax). We investigated whether grooming can be used to regulate group size by either ‘‘pay-for-help’’ or ‘‘pay-to-stay’’ mechanisms. Grooming of breeding females with breeding males and nonbreeding offspring was more intense and more balanced than with potentially breeding males, and most grooming occurred during the breeding females’ pregnancies. Grooming was skewed toward more investment by the breeding females with breeding males during the phases of ovarian activity, and with potentially breeding males during pregnancies. Our results suggest that grooming might be a mechanism used by female moustached tamarins to induce mate association with the breeding male, and to induce certain individuals to stay in the group and help with infant care.
Affiliation:
Department of Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, German Primate Centre; Department of Cognitive Ethology, German Primate Centre, Germany
Citation:
Grooming relationships between breeding females and adult group members in cooperatively breeding moustached tamarins (Saguinus mystax) 2007, 69 (10):1159 American Journal of Primatology
Journal:
American Journal of Primatology
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/596319
DOI:
10.1002/ajp.20411
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ajp.20411
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
02752565; 10982345
Sponsors:
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (HE 1870/10-1/2)
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLöttker, Petraen
dc.contributor.authorHuck, Marenen
dc.contributor.authorZinner, Dietmar P.en
dc.contributor.authorHeymann, Eckhard W.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-15T14:39:54Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-15T14:39:54Zen
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.citationGrooming relationships between breeding females and adult group members in cooperatively breeding moustached tamarins (Saguinus mystax) 2007, 69 (10):1159 American Journal of Primatologyen
dc.identifier.issn02752565en
dc.identifier.issn10982345en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajp.20411en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/596319en
dc.description.abstractGrooming is the most common form of affiliative behavior in primates that apart from hygienic and hedonistic benefits offers important social benefits for the performing individuals. This study examined grooming behavior in a cooperatively breeding primate species, characterized by single female breeding per group, polyandrous matings, dizygotic twinning, delayed offspring dispersal, and intensive helping behavior. In this system, breeding females profit from the presence of helpers but also helpers profit from staying in a group and assisting in infant care due to the accumulation of direct and indirect fitness benefits. We examined grooming relationships of breeding females with three classes of partners (breeding males, potentially breeding males, (sub)adult non-breeding offspring) during three reproductive phases (post-partum ovarian inactivity, ovarian activity, pregnancy) in two groups of wild moustached tamarins (Saguinus mystax). We investigated whether grooming can be used to regulate group size by either ‘‘pay-for-help’’ or ‘‘pay-to-stay’’ mechanisms. Grooming of breeding females with breeding males and nonbreeding offspring was more intense and more balanced than with potentially breeding males, and most grooming occurred during the breeding females’ pregnancies. Grooming was skewed toward more investment by the breeding females with breeding males during the phases of ovarian activity, and with potentially breeding males during pregnancies. Our results suggest that grooming might be a mechanism used by female moustached tamarins to induce mate association with the breeding male, and to induce certain individuals to stay in the group and help with infant care.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (HE 1870/10-1/2)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ajp.20411en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to American Journal of Primatologyen
dc.subjectSaguinus mystaxen
dc.subjectGroomingen
dc.subjectPay-to-stayen
dc.subjectPay-for-helpen
dc.titleGrooming relationships between breeding females and adult group members in cooperatively breeding moustached tamarins (Saguinus mystax)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, German Primate Centreen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cognitive Ethology, German Primate Centre, Germanyen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Primatologyen
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