Long-term patterns of sleeping site use in wild saddleback (Saguinus fuscicollis) and moustached tamarins (S. mystax): effects of foraging, thermoregulation, predation, and resource defense constraints

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/596318
Title:
Long-term patterns of sleeping site use in wild saddleback (Saguinus fuscicollis) and moustached tamarins (S. mystax): effects of foraging, thermoregulation, predation, and resource defense constraints
Authors:
Smith, Andrew C.; Knogge, Christoph; Huck, Maren ( 0000-0002-7740-3903 ) ; Löttker, Petra; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.; Heymann, Eckhard W.
Abstract:
Sleeping sites are an important aspect of an animal’s ecology given the length of time that they spend in them. The sleep ecology of wild saddleback and mustached tamarins is examined using a long-term data set covering three mixed-species troops and 1,3001 tamarin nights. Seasonal changes in photoperiod accounted for a significant amount of variation in sleeping site entry and exit times. Time of exit was more closely correlated with sunrise than time of entry was with sunset. Both species entered their sleeping sites when light levels were significantly higher than when they left them in the morning. Troops of both species used >80 individual sites, the majority being used once. Mustached tamarins never used the same site for more than two consecutive nights, but addlebacks reused the same site for up to four consecutive nights. mustached tamarins slept at significantly greater heights than saddleback tamarins. There were consistent interspecific differences in the types of sites used. Neither the presence of infants, season, nor rainfall affected the types or heights of sites chosen. Sleeping sites were located in the central area of exclusive use more often than expected, and their position with respect to fruiting trees indicated a strategy closer to that of a multiple central place forager than a central place forager. These findings are discussed in light of species ecology, with particular reference to predation risk, which is indicated as the major factor influencing the pattern of sleeping site use in these species.
Affiliation:
German Primate Centre, Göttingen; University of Sussex; Anglia Ruskin University; Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle; Department of Research and Documentation, Bavarian Forest National Park
Citation:
Long-term patterns of sleeping site use in wild saddleback (Saguinus fuscicollis) and moustached tamarins (S. mystax): effects of foraging, thermoregulation, predation, and resource defense constraints 2007, 134 (3):340 American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Journal:
American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/596318
DOI:
10.1002/ajpa.20676
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ajpa.20676
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
00029483; 10968644
Sponsors:
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council; Grant number: 98/S11498; Grant sponsor: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; Grant numbers: HE1870/3-3, HE1870/10-1,2, HE1870/3-1,3; Grant sponsor: Department of Psychology, University of Reading, UK.
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Andrew C.en
dc.contributor.authorKnogge, Christophen
dc.contributor.authorHuck, Marenen
dc.contributor.authorLöttker, Petraen
dc.contributor.authorBuchanan-Smith, Hannah M.en
dc.contributor.authorHeymann, Eckhard W.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-15T14:34:42Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-15T14:34:42Zen
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.citationLong-term patterns of sleeping site use in wild saddleback (Saguinus fuscicollis) and moustached tamarins (S. mystax): effects of foraging, thermoregulation, predation, and resource defense constraints 2007, 134 (3):340 American Journal of Physical Anthropologyen
dc.identifier.issn00029483en
dc.identifier.issn10968644en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajpa.20676en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/596318en
dc.description.abstractSleeping sites are an important aspect of an animal’s ecology given the length of time that they spend in them. The sleep ecology of wild saddleback and mustached tamarins is examined using a long-term data set covering three mixed-species troops and 1,3001 tamarin nights. Seasonal changes in photoperiod accounted for a significant amount of variation in sleeping site entry and exit times. Time of exit was more closely correlated with sunrise than time of entry was with sunset. Both species entered their sleeping sites when light levels were significantly higher than when they left them in the morning. Troops of both species used >80 individual sites, the majority being used once. Mustached tamarins never used the same site for more than two consecutive nights, but addlebacks reused the same site for up to four consecutive nights. mustached tamarins slept at significantly greater heights than saddleback tamarins. There were consistent interspecific differences in the types of sites used. Neither the presence of infants, season, nor rainfall affected the types or heights of sites chosen. Sleeping sites were located in the central area of exclusive use more often than expected, and their position with respect to fruiting trees indicated a strategy closer to that of a multiple central place forager than a central place forager. These findings are discussed in light of species ecology, with particular reference to predation risk, which is indicated as the major factor influencing the pattern of sleeping site use in these species.en
dc.description.sponsorshipBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council; Grant number: 98/S11498; Grant sponsor: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; Grant numbers: HE1870/3-3, HE1870/10-1,2, HE1870/3-1,3; Grant sponsor: Department of Psychology, University of Reading, UK.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ajpa.20676en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to American Journal of Physical Anthropologyen
dc.subjectPredation risken
dc.subjectForaging strategiesen
dc.subjectThermoregulationen
dc.subjectSaguinusen
dc.titleLong-term patterns of sleeping site use in wild saddleback (Saguinus fuscicollis) and moustached tamarins (S. mystax): effects of foraging, thermoregulation, predation, and resource defense constraintsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGerman Primate Centre, Göttingenen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sussexen
dc.contributor.departmentAnglia Ruskin Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUmweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Research and Documentation, Bavarian Forest National Parken
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropologyen
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