Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/300742
Title:
Anthropology of gastronomies
Authors:
Cseh, Leonard
Abstract:
“Tell me what you eat and I will tell you what you are” Savarin (1825) These defining words spoken in a time of dynamic changes within gastronomy arguably shaped the ideological consumption of food. This book chapter aims to discuss how the anthropology of gastronomies as a concept has always been of significance. It is only recently that the subject has risen from the fringe of academic inquiry to a more prominent position within the discipline, moving away from the simple listing of the constitutive aspects of the diet. (Herrmann and Gruneberg, 1993; Shimp, 1994; Sternberg and Grigorenko, 1997; Straughan and Roberts, 1999; Wagner, 2003; Wells, 1993). Furthermore, the chapter will show how food anthropology is embedded within cultures and has differing ideologies and meanings. Levi-Strauss, (1966) suggested that cognitive ability and consumption is based upon the tribal knowledge and examination on cultural habits such as behaviour and the way people think, classification patterns and their knowledge is a reflection of their collective experiences. The chapter aims to discuss the current and potential further implications of anthropology of gastronomies using 3 key themes/questions: • Can gastronomies be simply classified under an anthropological umbrella? • Is there a picture of our concern or apathy when it involves food? • If they can be proved can we truly determine anthropologies of gastronomies on a planet which now expresses personal representation and national identity with the food policy and the food it consumes? Food anthropology is not strictly limited to investigating one particular food ritual and its interaction with culture. Many studies have focused on fast foods and fast food restaurants and issues of globalization, trans-nationalism and offering of a contrived product described as authentic. Representations of gastronomies are also identified in the hermeneutics of its text (Tressider, 2011), (interpreted in several ways based on an individual’s ethnocentrism and experiences)
Affiliation:
University of Derby, Buxton
Issue Date:
27-Mar-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/300742
Type:
Other
Language:
en
Description:
This abstract (book chapter in progress) examines current debates, controversies and questions in this field and provides a systematic guide to the current state of knowledge on sustainable food, beverages and gastronomy in a holistic and interdisciplinary manner
Appears in Collections:
Culture, Lifestyle & Landscape Research Group; Department of Hotel, Resort & Spa Management

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCseh, Leonarden
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-04T08:19:57Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-04T08:19:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013-03-27-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/300742-
dc.descriptionThis abstract (book chapter in progress) examines current debates, controversies and questions in this field and provides a systematic guide to the current state of knowledge on sustainable food, beverages and gastronomy in a holistic and interdisciplinary manneren
dc.description.abstract“Tell me what you eat and I will tell you what you are” Savarin (1825) These defining words spoken in a time of dynamic changes within gastronomy arguably shaped the ideological consumption of food. This book chapter aims to discuss how the anthropology of gastronomies as a concept has always been of significance. It is only recently that the subject has risen from the fringe of academic inquiry to a more prominent position within the discipline, moving away from the simple listing of the constitutive aspects of the diet. (Herrmann and Gruneberg, 1993; Shimp, 1994; Sternberg and Grigorenko, 1997; Straughan and Roberts, 1999; Wagner, 2003; Wells, 1993). Furthermore, the chapter will show how food anthropology is embedded within cultures and has differing ideologies and meanings. Levi-Strauss, (1966) suggested that cognitive ability and consumption is based upon the tribal knowledge and examination on cultural habits such as behaviour and the way people think, classification patterns and their knowledge is a reflection of their collective experiences. The chapter aims to discuss the current and potential further implications of anthropology of gastronomies using 3 key themes/questions: • Can gastronomies be simply classified under an anthropological umbrella? • Is there a picture of our concern or apathy when it involves food? • If they can be proved can we truly determine anthropologies of gastronomies on a planet which now expresses personal representation and national identity with the food policy and the food it consumes? Food anthropology is not strictly limited to investigating one particular food ritual and its interaction with culture. Many studies have focused on fast foods and fast food restaurants and issues of globalization, trans-nationalism and offering of a contrived product described as authentic. Representations of gastronomies are also identified in the hermeneutics of its text (Tressider, 2011), (interpreted in several ways based on an individual’s ethnocentrism and experiences)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAnthropologyen
dc.subjectGastronomyen
dc.subjectIdentityen
dc.subjectHermeneuticsen
dc.titleAnthropology of gastronomiesen
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derby, Buxtonen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.