From Modernism and under the Fascist flag of Italian Nation to Post-modernist urban sprawl

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/294072
Title:
From Modernism and under the Fascist flag of Italian Nation to Post-modernist urban sprawl
Authors:
Tracada, Eleni ( 0000-0002-0362-4260 )
Abstract:
In early 20th century, architecture had no place as a national recognised school in Italy. Architects’ professional formation was blended inside the Academies of Arts and just few of them were trained in Engineering Schools of the northern part of the country. There were strict limitations in being creative in design and architecture, because of the tendency to imitate and follow the past, until the strategy of design and architecture changed tune by aligning modernist ideas to a controversial transformation. With the Rationalist Exhibitions of architectural design in the 1930s, architecture acquired the official support and protection of Mussolini himself; the ultra modernist projects of the first students of the newly founded architectural schools of Rome and Florence had an immediate impact to politics in such a way that in the following years modernist architecture became the Nation’s architecture showing up in large scale competitions, such the EUR in Rome and the Railway Station of Florence. The Nation’s architecture had such an influence to policy making that all the planning laws after World War II were based on the first laws in the 1930s and 1940s; the nationalist regime managed to put forward rules and regulations which had to re-format the built environment through the development master plans in the 1950s and beyond.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Tracada, E. (2010) ‘From Modernism and under the Fascist flag of Italian Nation to Post-modernist urban sprawl: the emergence and the power of the Schools of Architecture in Italy’ in Quek, R. (ed.) Proceedings of the Conference Theoretical Currents I: Architecture, Design, and the Nation, 13-15 September 2010, theme of ‘Historical Perspectives’, pp282-290
Publisher:
East Midlands History and Philosophy of Architecture Research Network (University of Nottingham, Nottingham Trent University, University of derby, University of Lincoln)
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/294072
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This paper was presented during the International conference: ‘Theoretical Currents I: Architecture, Design, and the Nation’. Theme: ‘Historical Perspectives’. It was presented on 15th September 2010 and published in the Proceedings of Theoretical Currents I in 2010.
Sponsors:
ADT funds, University of Derby
Appears in Collections:
The Built Environment Research Group (BERG)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTracada, Elenien
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-17T08:34:12Zen
dc.date.available2013-06-17T08:34:12Zen
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.citationTracada, E. (2010) ‘From Modernism and under the Fascist flag of Italian Nation to Post-modernist urban sprawl: the emergence and the power of the Schools of Architecture in Italy’ in Quek, R. (ed.) Proceedings of the Conference Theoretical Currents I: Architecture, Design, and the Nation, 13-15 September 2010, theme of ‘Historical Perspectives’, pp282-290en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/294072en
dc.descriptionThis paper was presented during the International conference: ‘Theoretical Currents I: Architecture, Design, and the Nation’. Theme: ‘Historical Perspectives’. It was presented on 15th September 2010 and published in the Proceedings of Theoretical Currents I in 2010.en
dc.description.abstractIn early 20th century, architecture had no place as a national recognised school in Italy. Architects’ professional formation was blended inside the Academies of Arts and just few of them were trained in Engineering Schools of the northern part of the country. There were strict limitations in being creative in design and architecture, because of the tendency to imitate and follow the past, until the strategy of design and architecture changed tune by aligning modernist ideas to a controversial transformation. With the Rationalist Exhibitions of architectural design in the 1930s, architecture acquired the official support and protection of Mussolini himself; the ultra modernist projects of the first students of the newly founded architectural schools of Rome and Florence had an immediate impact to politics in such a way that in the following years modernist architecture became the Nation’s architecture showing up in large scale competitions, such the EUR in Rome and the Railway Station of Florence. The Nation’s architecture had such an influence to policy making that all the planning laws after World War II were based on the first laws in the 1930s and 1940s; the nationalist regime managed to put forward rules and regulations which had to re-format the built environment through the development master plans in the 1950s and beyond.en
dc.description.sponsorshipADT funds, University of Derbyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEast Midlands History and Philosophy of Architecture Research Network (University of Nottingham, Nottingham Trent University, University of derby, University of Lincoln)en
dc.titleFrom Modernism and under the Fascist flag of Italian Nation to Post-modernist urban sprawlen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.orcidorcid.org/0000-0002-0362-4260en
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