Urban badger setts: characteristics, patterns of use and management implications

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/293708
Title:
Urban badger setts: characteristics, patterns of use and management implications
Authors:
Davison, John; Huck, Maren ( 0000-0002-7740-3903 ) ; Delahay, R. J.; Roper, Timothy J.
Abstract:
Damage caused by badger setts is an important source of human–carnivore conflict in urban areas of the UK, yet little is known about the spatial distribution of urban badger setts or their pattern of occupation. We compared the density, spatial distribution and size of setts in four urban and two rural study areas in the UK and assessed the applicability to urban systems of distinguishing between ‘main’ and ‘outlier’ setts. In addition, we used radio-telemetry to investigate diurnal patterns of sett use in one urban area (Brighton). It was possible to distinguish between main and outlier setts in urban environments, and local sett densities were comparable in urban and rural areas. However, urban badgers used substantially fewer setts than did a nearby rural population, and they spent a smaller proportion of days in outlier setts. Social groups with larger ranges had more setts available to them and, within groups, individuals with larger ranges used more setts. Outliers appeared to serve multiple functions, including allowing efficient and safe travel to important parts of the home range. We conclude that sett densities can be high in urban habitats, suggesting significant potential for settrelated problems to arise. The fact that urban main setts can be distinguished from outliers enables management actions to be tailored accordingly. In particular, because main setts seem to represent a particularly valuable resource to urban
Affiliation:
University of Sussex
Citation:
Urban badger setts: characteristics, patterns of use and management implications 2008, 275 (2):190 Journal of Zoology
Journal:
Journal of Zoology
Issue Date:
10-Jun-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/293708
DOI:
10.1111/j.1469-7998.2008.00424.x
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1469-7998.2008.00424.x
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0952-8369; 1469-7998
Sponsors:
Defra WSC (contract WM0304); Marie Curie Intra-European Postdoctoral Fellowships
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDavison, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHuck, Marenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDelahay, R. J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoper, Timothy J.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-10T11:23:05Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-10T11:23:05Z-
dc.date.issued2013-06-10-
dc.identifier.citationUrban badger setts: characteristics, patterns of use and management implications 2008, 275 (2):190 Journal of Zoologyen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0952-8369-
dc.identifier.issn1469-7998-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1469-7998.2008.00424.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/293708-
dc.description.abstractDamage caused by badger setts is an important source of human–carnivore conflict in urban areas of the UK, yet little is known about the spatial distribution of urban badger setts or their pattern of occupation. We compared the density, spatial distribution and size of setts in four urban and two rural study areas in the UK and assessed the applicability to urban systems of distinguishing between ‘main’ and ‘outlier’ setts. In addition, we used radio-telemetry to investigate diurnal patterns of sett use in one urban area (Brighton). It was possible to distinguish between main and outlier setts in urban environments, and local sett densities were comparable in urban and rural areas. However, urban badgers used substantially fewer setts than did a nearby rural population, and they spent a smaller proportion of days in outlier setts. Social groups with larger ranges had more setts available to them and, within groups, individuals with larger ranges used more setts. Outliers appeared to serve multiple functions, including allowing efficient and safe travel to important parts of the home range. We conclude that sett densities can be high in urban habitats, suggesting significant potential for settrelated problems to arise. The fact that urban main setts can be distinguished from outliers enables management actions to be tailored accordingly. In particular, because main setts seem to represent a particularly valuable resource to urbanen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipDefra WSC (contract WM0304); Marie Curie Intra-European Postdoctoral Fellowshipsen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1469-7998.2008.00424.xen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Zoologyen_GB
dc.subjectMeles melesen_GB
dc.titleUrban badger setts: characteristics, patterns of use and management implications-
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sussexen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Zoologyen_GB
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