Arabic language and Islamic Studies: who studies Arabic and how can these skills be used at university and beyond?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/292730
Title:
Arabic language and Islamic Studies: who studies Arabic and how can these skills be used at university and beyond?
Authors:
Scott-Baumann, Alison; Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya
Abstract:
This work was undertaken in 2011-12 as the result of successful competitive bidding for research funds from the subject centre for Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies (LLAS). Learning a modern foreign language in UK has declined, yet the learning of Arabic is rising. Furthermore HEFCE designates Arabic as a Strategically Important and Vulnerable Subject (SIVS). This is important as it implies greater resources and support for Arabic courses. Although Classical Arabic previously had a code, the SIVS status of Arabic has increased its visibility and has led to four new codes for Arabic Language Studies, Modern Standard Arabic and related subjects in HESA’s latest JACS 3 listing (September 2011). We hypothesised that there is more Arabic language interest and competence among Islamic Studies students than is currently apparent in the university sector and in the independent Muslim institution sector, and found persuasive evidence for our hypothesis: moreover, we found that if the Arabic experience is neither assessed nor accredited this may represent missed career opportunities for such students. We explored possible relationships between students’ prior Arabic competence and Arabic language courses at Islamic Studies and other departments within UK universities. This study recognises the significance of Arabic language studies that students undertake in Muslim institutions such as Darul Ulooms, Madaris (singular madrassa), Muslim schools and Muslim HE colleges. It suggests that collaborations between Muslim institutions and universities could lead to cross fertilisation of curricula and pedagogy and staff exchanges. Furthermore, recognising students’ prior learning of Arabic could be beneficial to students, who would have options to enhance their skills and career opportunities, and also to universities who would have access to an increased cohort of potential students.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Scott-Baumann, A and Cheruvallil-Contractor, S 2012. Research Report: Arabic language and Islamic Studies: who studies Arabic and how can these skills be used at university and beyond?, HEA: LLAS
Publisher:
Higher Education Academy (HEA)
Issue Date:
Mar-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/292730
Additional Links:
http://www.islamicstudiesnetwork.ac.uk/islamicstudiesnetwork/resources/display?id=/resources/alldetails/islamicstudies/Arabic_languages_and_IS_AS-B
Type:
Research Report
Language:
en
Sponsors:
Higher Education Academy (HEA) Subject Centre for Languages Linguistics and Area Studies (LLAS)
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Society, Religion and Belief

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorScott-Baumann, Alisonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCheruvallil-Contractor, Sariyaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-24T10:17:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-24T10:17:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012-03-
dc.identifier.citationScott-Baumann, A and Cheruvallil-Contractor, S 2012. Research Report: Arabic language and Islamic Studies: who studies Arabic and how can these skills be used at university and beyond?, HEA: LLASen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/292730-
dc.description.abstractThis work was undertaken in 2011-12 as the result of successful competitive bidding for research funds from the subject centre for Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies (LLAS). Learning a modern foreign language in UK has declined, yet the learning of Arabic is rising. Furthermore HEFCE designates Arabic as a Strategically Important and Vulnerable Subject (SIVS). This is important as it implies greater resources and support for Arabic courses. Although Classical Arabic previously had a code, the SIVS status of Arabic has increased its visibility and has led to four new codes for Arabic Language Studies, Modern Standard Arabic and related subjects in HESA’s latest JACS 3 listing (September 2011). We hypothesised that there is more Arabic language interest and competence among Islamic Studies students than is currently apparent in the university sector and in the independent Muslim institution sector, and found persuasive evidence for our hypothesis: moreover, we found that if the Arabic experience is neither assessed nor accredited this may represent missed career opportunities for such students. We explored possible relationships between students’ prior Arabic competence and Arabic language courses at Islamic Studies and other departments within UK universities. This study recognises the significance of Arabic language studies that students undertake in Muslim institutions such as Darul Ulooms, Madaris (singular madrassa), Muslim schools and Muslim HE colleges. It suggests that collaborations between Muslim institutions and universities could lead to cross fertilisation of curricula and pedagogy and staff exchanges. Furthermore, recognising students’ prior learning of Arabic could be beneficial to students, who would have options to enhance their skills and career opportunities, and also to universities who would have access to an increased cohort of potential students.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipHigher Education Academy (HEA) Subject Centre for Languages Linguistics and Area Studies (LLAS)en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHigher Education Academy (HEA)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.islamicstudiesnetwork.ac.uk/islamicstudiesnetwork/resources/display?id=/resources/alldetails/islamicstudies/Arabic_languages_and_IS_AS-Ben_GB
dc.subjectLanguageen_GB
dc.subjectArabicen_GB
dc.subjectIslamen_GB
dc.subjectMuslimsen_GB
dc.subjectHigher educationen_GB
dc.subjectCohesionen_GB
dc.subjectCareer developmenten_GB
dc.subjectEmployabilityen_GB
dc.titleArabic language and Islamic Studies: who studies Arabic and how can these skills be used at university and beyond?en
dc.typeResearch Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_GB
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