A cosmopolitan ethos within a global Law curriculum: comparative law as its promoter

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/292351
Title:
A cosmopolitan ethos within a global Law curriculum: comparative law as its promoter
Authors:
Platsas, Antonios E.
Abstract:
In this paper the author will commence his analysis by exposing the apparent absence of a global law curriculum for law students. He will attempt to highlight the fact that lawyers around the world tend to engage themselves with national law material, when our world environment asks for a legal education of a more ecumenical character. Accordingly, the paper acts on the assumption that national law curricula tend to operate on the basis of predisposed agendas. Therefore, we, in the discipline of law, find ourselves in a clearly paradoxical situation, a situation which conflicts not only the epistemological unity of other disciplines but also the very process of globalisation. As the leading law comparatists Zweigert and Kötz have argued some time ago ‘[t]here is no such thing as “German” physics or “British” microbiology or “Canadian” geology’. But we in the discipline of law find ourselves teaching national law curricula which are the by-product of nationalisms and historical accidents. It is believed that there has to be re-alignment of the law curriculum by re-enforcing the international and comparative law elements and by reducing the national law elements thereof. In other words, we must push for a law curriculum which truly reflects a global studies state of affairs, a global law curriculum. We need to re-address the matter by promoting a law curriculum which will promote a more cosmopolitan legal ethos, a better understanding of universal truths such as legal axioms, principles and ideas which are appealing and comprehensible to legal scientists from all over the world. The analysis will conclude that the subject of comparative law acts as the driving force for a more internationalised legal education and that such a type of education is something that has to be sought in the modern academic world.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
AE Platsas, A cosmopolitan ethos within a global law curriculum: comparative law as its promoter' (2009) 2(4) Global Studies Journal 57-72.
Publisher:
CGPublisher
Journal:
Global Studies
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/292351
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Sponsors:
The work has been conducted under the Teaching Informed by Research (TIR) 2008/2009 Initiative of the University of Derby.
Appears in Collections:
The Law in Society Research Group; Derby Law School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPlatsas, Antonios E.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-20T11:20:04Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-20T11:20:04Zen
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.citationAE Platsas, A cosmopolitan ethos within a global law curriculum: comparative law as its promoter' (2009) 2(4) Global Studies Journal 57-72.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/292351en
dc.description.abstractIn this paper the author will commence his analysis by exposing the apparent absence of a global law curriculum for law students. He will attempt to highlight the fact that lawyers around the world tend to engage themselves with national law material, when our world environment asks for a legal education of a more ecumenical character. Accordingly, the paper acts on the assumption that national law curricula tend to operate on the basis of predisposed agendas. Therefore, we, in the discipline of law, find ourselves in a clearly paradoxical situation, a situation which conflicts not only the epistemological unity of other disciplines but also the very process of globalisation. As the leading law comparatists Zweigert and Kötz have argued some time ago ‘[t]here is no such thing as “German” physics or “British” microbiology or “Canadian” geology’. But we in the discipline of law find ourselves teaching national law curricula which are the by-product of nationalisms and historical accidents. It is believed that there has to be re-alignment of the law curriculum by re-enforcing the international and comparative law elements and by reducing the national law elements thereof. In other words, we must push for a law curriculum which truly reflects a global studies state of affairs, a global law curriculum. We need to re-address the matter by promoting a law curriculum which will promote a more cosmopolitan legal ethos, a better understanding of universal truths such as legal axioms, principles and ideas which are appealing and comprehensible to legal scientists from all over the world. The analysis will conclude that the subject of comparative law acts as the driving force for a more internationalised legal education and that such a type of education is something that has to be sought in the modern academic world.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThe work has been conducted under the Teaching Informed by Research (TIR) 2008/2009 Initiative of the University of Derby.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCGPublisheren_GB
dc.subjectCosmopolitan legal ethosen_GB
dc.subjectGlobal law curriculumen
dc.subjectComparative lawen
dc.subjectGlobalisationen
dc.subjectLegal education of ecumenical characteren
dc.titleA cosmopolitan ethos within a global Law curriculum: comparative law as its promoteren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_GB
dc.identifier.journalGlobal Studiesen_GB
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