Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/291129
Title:
Singing Pools
Authors:
Locke, Caroline
Issue Date:
17-Apr-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/291129
Type:
Other
Description:
Singing Pools is a major commission that strengthens International links. The sound sculpture is permanent so has an impact over many years. Research involved exploring ways in which the sound fountain designs could be developed and extended so that the sculptures could be permanently placed within an existing body of water. The outcome of the research involves three floating steel (singing) pools, which are installed in a lake within the sculpture park. When visitors trigger outdoor sensors they activate motors, which are attached to the steel pools. The movement of the motors sends wave formations across the surface of the water – thus mimicking the movement of sound. The research is challenging and original. Because it is unique, construction of this work has developed slowly. The experimental stages (April – September 2012) have led to several changes in the designs. A new floating design has recently been completed and has been installed at the Park in October 2012. The final Singing Pool was installed in April 2013 and is now part of the Klankenbos (Sound Forest) collection at Musica in Neerpelt, Belgium. Klankenbos is a collection of sound sculptures in the open air.
Appears in Collections:
D-Marc

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLocke, Carolineen
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-15T08:14:57Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-15T08:14:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013-04-17-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/291129-
dc.descriptionSinging Pools is a major commission that strengthens International links. The sound sculpture is permanent so has an impact over many years. Research involved exploring ways in which the sound fountain designs could be developed and extended so that the sculptures could be permanently placed within an existing body of water. The outcome of the research involves three floating steel (singing) pools, which are installed in a lake within the sculpture park. When visitors trigger outdoor sensors they activate motors, which are attached to the steel pools. The movement of the motors sends wave formations across the surface of the water – thus mimicking the movement of sound. The research is challenging and original. Because it is unique, construction of this work has developed slowly. The experimental stages (April – September 2012) have led to several changes in the designs. A new floating design has recently been completed and has been installed at the Park in October 2012. The final Singing Pool was installed in April 2013 and is now part of the Klankenbos (Sound Forest) collection at Musica in Neerpelt, Belgium. Klankenbos is a collection of sound sculptures in the open air.en
dc.subjectSound sculptureen
dc.subjectPublic arten
dc.titleSinging Pools-
dc.typeOtheren
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.