Predicting European badger Meles meles sett distribution in urban environments

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/270368
Title:
Predicting European badger Meles meles sett distribution in urban environments
Authors:
Huck, Maren ( 0000-0002-7740-3903 ) ; Davison, John; Roper, Timothy J.
Abstract:
Natural England receives an increasing number of complaints about problems caused by badgers Meles meles in urban and suburban environments, most of which concern problems caused by the digging of burrows (setts). The aim of our study was to identify factors related to the presence of badger setts in urban and suburban areas, in order to provide information relevant to the development of an urban badger management strategy. We identified habitat factors (including human population density) associated with the presence of badger setts in four extensively surveyed towns or cities in England, in a GIS-based approach using binary logistic regression analysis. Badger sett densities in urban areas were comparable to sett densities in most rural parts of the UK. Thus, badgers can achieve relatively high population densities in urban environments, despite the potential for human-badger conflict. The single most important factor predicting sett location was the type of habitat in which the sett in question was located, followed by the slope of the ground at that location. Sett presence was also predicted by the proximity of other setts, and badgers preferred areas with intermediate human population densities. The population density of badgers in urban and suburban environments appears to be mainly related to the availability of suitable places for locating setts, rather than to factors that would be expected to reflect food availability. This information will help to predict potential sites of badger-related problems and may be relevant to understanding the ecological requirements of other carnivore species that inhabit urban environments, such as red fox Vulpes vulpes, stone marten Martes foina and racoon Procyon lotor.
Affiliation:
University of Sussex
Citation:
Predicting European badger Meles meles sett distribution in urban environments 2008, 14 (2):188 Wildlife Biology
Publisher:
the Nordic Council for Wildlife Research
Journal:
Wildlife Biology
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/270368
DOI:
10.2981/0909-6396(2008)14[188:PEBMMS]2.0.CO;2
Additional Links:
http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.2981/0909-6396%282008%2914%5B188%3APEBMMS%5D2.0.CO%3B2
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0909-6396
Sponsors:
Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship (BSSUB - 24007); Defra WSC contract WM0304; Permission to upload the pdf on this repository was granted by Wildlife Biology
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHuck, Marenen
dc.contributor.authorDavison, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorRoper, Timothy J.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-25T16:24:08Z-
dc.date.available2013-02-25T16:24:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationPredicting European badger Meles meles sett distribution in urban environments 2008, 14 (2):188 Wildlife Biologyen
dc.identifier.issn0909-6396-
dc.identifier.doi10.2981/0909-6396(2008)14[188:PEBMMS]2.0.CO;2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/270368-
dc.description.abstractNatural England receives an increasing number of complaints about problems caused by badgers Meles meles in urban and suburban environments, most of which concern problems caused by the digging of burrows (setts). The aim of our study was to identify factors related to the presence of badger setts in urban and suburban areas, in order to provide information relevant to the development of an urban badger management strategy. We identified habitat factors (including human population density) associated with the presence of badger setts in four extensively surveyed towns or cities in England, in a GIS-based approach using binary logistic regression analysis. Badger sett densities in urban areas were comparable to sett densities in most rural parts of the UK. Thus, badgers can achieve relatively high population densities in urban environments, despite the potential for human-badger conflict. The single most important factor predicting sett location was the type of habitat in which the sett in question was located, followed by the slope of the ground at that location. Sett presence was also predicted by the proximity of other setts, and badgers preferred areas with intermediate human population densities. The population density of badgers in urban and suburban environments appears to be mainly related to the availability of suitable places for locating setts, rather than to factors that would be expected to reflect food availability. This information will help to predict potential sites of badger-related problems and may be relevant to understanding the ecological requirements of other carnivore species that inhabit urban environments, such as red fox Vulpes vulpes, stone marten Martes foina and racoon Procyon lotor.en
dc.description.sponsorshipMarie Curie Intra-European Fellowship (BSSUB - 24007); Defra WSC contract WM0304; Permission to upload the pdf on this repository was granted by Wildlife Biologyen
dc.publisherthe Nordic Council for Wildlife Researchen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.2981/0909-6396%282008%2914%5B188%3APEBMMS%5D2.0.CO%3B2en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Wildlife Biologyen
dc.subjectEuropean badgeren
dc.subjectGISen
dc.subjectLogistic regressionen
dc.subjectMeles melesen
dc.subjectSett distributionen
dc.subjectUrban ecologyen
dc.titlePredicting European badger Meles meles sett distribution in urban environments-
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sussexen
dc.identifier.journalWildlife Biologyen
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