3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/192718
Title:
A brief haemophilia pain coping questionnaire
Authors:
Elander, James; Robinson, Georgina
Abstract:
Pain coping strategies are important influences on outcomes among people with painful chronic conditions. The pain coping strategies questionnaire (CSQ) was reviously adapted for sickle cell disease and haemophilia, but those versions have 80 items, and a briefer version with similar psychometric properties would facilitate research on pain coping. The full-length haemophilia-adapted CSQ, plus measures of pain frequency and intensity, pain acceptance, pain readiness to change, and health-related quality of life were completed by 190 men with haemophilia. Items were selected for a 27-item short form, which was completed 6 months later by 129 (68%) participants. Factor structure, reliability and concurrent validity were the same in the long and short forms. For the short form, internal reliabilities of the three composite scales were 0.86 for negative thoughts, 0.80 for active coping and 0.76 for passive adherence. Test–retest reliabilities were 0.73 for negative thoughts, 0.70 for active coping and 0.64 for passive adherence. Negative thoughts were associated with less readiness to change, less acceptance of pain and more impaired health-related quality of life, whereas active coping was associated with greater readiness to change and more acceptance of pain. The short form is a convenient brief measure of pain coping with good psychometric properties, and could be used to extend research on pain coping in haemophilia.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
A brief haemophilia pain coping questionnaire 2008, 14 (5):1039 Haemophilia
Journal:
Haemophilia
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/192718
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2516.2008.01822.x
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1365-2516.2008.01822.x
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Development and psychometric assessment of a questionnaire measuring pain coping for people with haemophilia
ISSN:
13518216; 13652516
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorElander, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Georginaen
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-01T09:35:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-01T09:35:22Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationA brief haemophilia pain coping questionnaire 2008, 14 (5):1039 Haemophiliaen
dc.identifier.issn13518216-
dc.identifier.issn13652516-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2516.2008.01822.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/192718-
dc.descriptionDevelopment and psychometric assessment of a questionnaire measuring pain coping for people with haemophiliaen
dc.description.abstractPain coping strategies are important influences on outcomes among people with painful chronic conditions. The pain coping strategies questionnaire (CSQ) was reviously adapted for sickle cell disease and haemophilia, but those versions have 80 items, and a briefer version with similar psychometric properties would facilitate research on pain coping. The full-length haemophilia-adapted CSQ, plus measures of pain frequency and intensity, pain acceptance, pain readiness to change, and health-related quality of life were completed by 190 men with haemophilia. Items were selected for a 27-item short form, which was completed 6 months later by 129 (68%) participants. Factor structure, reliability and concurrent validity were the same in the long and short forms. For the short form, internal reliabilities of the three composite scales were 0.86 for negative thoughts, 0.80 for active coping and 0.76 for passive adherence. Test–retest reliabilities were 0.73 for negative thoughts, 0.70 for active coping and 0.64 for passive adherence. Negative thoughts were associated with less readiness to change, less acceptance of pain and more impaired health-related quality of life, whereas active coping was associated with greater readiness to change and more acceptance of pain. The short form is a convenient brief measure of pain coping with good psychometric properties, and could be used to extend research on pain coping in haemophilia.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1365-2516.2008.01822.xen
dc.subjectPainen
dc.subjectCopingen
dc.subjectHemophiliaen
dc.titleA brief haemophilia pain coping questionnaireen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalHaemophiliaen
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